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Napa County property transactions recently recorded

Napa

Address Record Date Sale Price Bed Bath Sq Ft Yr Blt Lot Size Acres

2009 W. F St. 3/16 $6,500 3 2 1,381 1948 14,002 0.32

2765 Kilburn Ave. 3/12 $143,000 3 2 1,378 1941 5,044 0.12

1520 E St. 2/28 $215,000 2 1 1,032 1899 7,708 0.18

2101 Russell St. 2/9 $300,000 3 2 1,237 1956 7,175 0.16

72 Chelsea Ave. 3/1 $315,000 3 1 1,102 1941 5,496 0.13

52 Westwood Ave. 3/5 $425,000 3 2 1,590 1941 5,693 0.13

1521 Menlo Ave. 2/16 $435,000 3 2 1,274 1950 7,500 0.17

5 Birch Place 3/16 $435,000 2 1 747 1941 5,546 0.13

2641 Kilburn Ave. 3/13 $445,000 2 1 765 1941 5,044 0.12

710 Pueblo Ave. 2/28 $450,000 3 1 1,046 1955 6,473 0.15

2130 Holmes Ave. 3/5 $460,000 3 1 891 1950 5,036 0.12

2841 Redwood Rd 3/13 $460,000 3 2 1,880 1956 39,705 0.91

1167 Whitney Ave. 2/23 $463,000 3 2 1,556 1952 5,801 0.13

2514 Sonoma St. 3/1 $470,000 2 1 836 1948 6,086 0.14

2757 Old Sonoma Rd 3/2 $478,000 3 1 1,366 1951 9,094 0.21

2098 Sommer St. 3/19 $485,000 3 2 1,066 1964 6,000 0.14

2166 Delpha Drive 2/27 $489,000 3 1 1,141 1954 0 0.14

2891 Kilburn Ave. 2/15 $489,000 2 1 747 1941 6,059 0.14

1741 Pueblo Ave. 2/26 $490,000 3 2 1,374 1954 7,766 0.18

1193 London Way 3/14 $529,000 4 2 1,613 1954 6,119 0.14

2719 Crocker St. 2/20 $535,000 3 2 1,256 1960 6,360 0.15

2542 Patricia Drive 2/16 $535,000 3 2 1,438 1965 7,349 0.17

3966 Raleigh St. 3/12 $540,000 4 2 1,546 1968 7,014 0.16

3265 Baywood Lane 12/28 $558,000 3 2 1,175 1969 6,205 0.14

2901 Pine St. 3/9 $567,500 3 2 1,446 1940 5,384 0.12

3256 Macdonald St. 3/20 $567,500 3 1 1,085 1972 6,101 0.14

1539 Cinnamond St. 3/16 $570,000 2 1 845 1950 6,536 0.15

70 Linnell Ave. 3/8 $570,000 3 2 1,084 1942 6,555 0.15

2479 Pacific St. 2/7 $570,000 2 2 936 1943 6,213 0.14

149 Lilienthal Ave. 3/20 $570,000 2 1 1,236 1920 6,000 0.14

1254 Sierra Ave. 2/23 $574,000 3 2 1,281 1962 5,977 0.14

4467 Meadowlark Drive 3/2 $589,000 4 2 1,560 1973 6,300 0.14

1408 Vista Ave. 2/20 $590,000 2 1 1,092 1950 5,944 0.14

3683 Norfolk St. 2/28 $595,000 3 2 1,216 1959 6,121 0.14

2789 Pine St. 2/16 $598,000 3 1 1,076 1955 9,540 0.22

755 Ponder Court 2/21 $608,000 3 3 2,106 2007 5,117 0

2042 Devonshire Drive 2/26 $625,000 3 2 1,321 1993 4,446 0.1

2454 MacLennan St. 3/12 $635,000 3 2 1,348 1967 6,862 0.16

2926 Hilltop Drive 3/13 $636,500 2 1 1,224 1949 8,667 0.2

4471 Moffitt Drive 2/22 $643,000 3 2 1,313 1970 5,960 0.14

1675 Santiago Ave. 3/2 $655,000 4 2 1,814 1974 6,300 0.14

2582 Vine Hill Drive 3/5 $659,000 4 2 1,334 1973 6,600 0.15

57 Harvard Lane 3/5 $675,000 3 2 1,571 1957 10,758 0.25

4225 Wine Country Court 2/9 $679,000 4 3 1,981 2017 4,300 0

4215 Wine Country Court 2/23 $679,000 4 3 0 2017 5,411 0

2268 Las Flores Drive 3/19 $690,000 5 3 2,343 1974 6,834 0.16

4139 Ortez Court 2/20 $712,000 5 3 2,343 1974 9,779 0.22

3282 Eugene Court 2/28 $714,000 3 2 1,822 1970 9,454 0.22

3409 Boulder Creek Court 3/14 $717,500 4 2 1,845 1975 7,544 0.17

1225 Cayetano Drive 2/16 $736,000 4 3 2,241 2000 6,774 0.16

2144 Wilkins Ave. 3/15 $743,000 2 1 1,228 1945 10,536 0.24

4245 Wine Country Court 2/15 $750,000 4 3 2,148 2017 7,225 0

485 Randolph St. 2/15 $759,000 2 1 806 1935 3,188 0.07

3321 Stratford Court 2/13 $769,000 3 2 2,048 1990 9,116 0.21

26 Casassa Court 2/23 $799,000 4 3 2,258 2012 6,542 0.15

2578 Patricia Drive 3/14 $810,000 4 2 1,845 1977 11,231 0.26

2045 W F St. 2/14 $815,000 3 2 1,772 1956 15,311 0.35

1409 East Ave. 2/28 $825,000 3 2 1,427 1940 5,338 0.12

3384 Royal Court 3/15 $830,000 4 2 2,049 1978 9,755 0.22

4420 Dumas St. 2/23 $830,000 4 3 2,407 1995 5,217 0.12

6 Montecito Blvd 2/26 $840,000 2 2 1,316 1941 4,273 0.1

2376 Chad Court 3/2 $850,000 4 3 2,164 1978 8,514 0.2

4118 Salmon Creek Lane 3/14 $850,000 4 3 1,919 1991 5,321 0.12

1498 Center St. 2/7 $890,000 4 3 2,140 1938 7,251 0.17

931 Serendipity Way 2/23 $940,000 3 3 2,077 2015 12,037 0.28

606 Seminary St. 2/16 $1,049,000 3 2 1,457 1915 4,675 0.11

410 Stonecrest Drive 3/12 $1,200,000 3 2 3,619 1936 125,860 2.84

200 Cardwell Court 2/22 $1,213,000 3 3 3,270 2009 10,000 0.23

10 Lone Wood Court 2/22 $1,315,000 3 3 3,209 2017 9,908 0

49 Cove Court 3/21 $1,350,000 3 2 1,855 1990 0 0.21

3741 Beartooth Lane 3/15 $1,495,000 5 4 3,856 2010 17,565 0.4

17 N Newport Drive 3/7 $1,525,000 4 3 2,481 1997 0 0.26

16 Merion Circle 3/9 $1,715,000 3 3 2,348 1969 29,339 0.67

633 Montecito Blvd 2/16 $1,775,000 3 4 2,513 1956 70,990 1.68

1183 Ross Circle 2/21 $1,964,500 4 3 3,187 1978 39,835 0.91

1161 Castle Oaks Drive 2/28 $2,200,000 5 5 4,753 2002 29,780 0.68

194 Kaanapali Drive 2/9 $2,500,000 2 3 2,453 1973 9,872 0.23


National
AP
Job licensing details trip up storm-displaced Puerto Ricans

HARTFORD, Conn. — Trained as a massage therapist in her native Puerto Rico, Catalina Olea says she can only dream of the jobs advertised at Connecticut hotels and spas offering salaries of $40,000 or even $50,000.

Since leaving the island after Hurricane Maria, Olea said she has struggled to pin down how to obtain the professional license she needs to work in her field. For now, she is focusing on improving her English while her husband, an information systems engineer, supports the family by driving for Uber.

“We thought opportunities here would be better,” she said. “It’s a difficult process.”

For Puerto Ricans looking to escape the hurricane’s aftermath, their American citizenship has made relocating to the U.S. mainland as simple as buying a plane ticket. But finding work in their profession can be more complicated. Many have encountered hurdles in getting their credentials recognized, including the absence of documents that were lost or damaged in the storm, state requirements that require additional training and applications for job licenses that can cost hundreds of dollars.

In states that have seen some of the biggest influxes of storm-displaced islanders, advocates and elected officials have proposed changes to help the teachers, hairdressers, medical technicians and others.

In New Jersey, a legislative proposal would clarify that professional licenses from Puerto Rico should be given the same consideration for reciprocity as those from other U.S. states.

“People are displaced. They’re running into some barriers, and I thought it was important to clarify our law and fix it,” said Republican state Sen. Thomas Kean Jr., the bill’s sponsor.

In Massachusetts, people who have come from Puerto Rico are eligible to have licensing fees waived, according to the governor’s office. In Connecticut, where the mayors of the biggest cities have appealed for occupational license fees to be waived, Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said he does not have authority to do that himself but he would support legislative efforts to give the Department of Consumer Protection discretion to do so.

Since the hurricane tore across Puerto Rico in September, tens of thousands of islanders have relocated to the mainland to escape the scarcity-marked aftermath and the island’s decadelong economic crisis.

Financial hardship was driving many to relocate even before the storm, and many are now arriving without the extra cash to pay for licensing they might have already gone through in Puerto Rico, according to Samantha Vargas Poppe, an associate director of the policy analysis center at the UnidosUS advocacy group.

“Latinos tend to have higher unemployment rates, and they tend to be concentrated in lower-wage sectors like hospitality and retail, jobs that don’t often come with great benefits. Puerto Ricans coming in to the U.S. who don’t have a job lined up are going to face the same barriers if not more,” she said.

Olea, 33, said she and her husband had been thinking of moving even before the hurricane blew out the windows of their sixth-floor apartment in Guaynabo. A few weeks later, with the spa where she worked still closed amid widespread power outages, they moved to Hartford. The family is getting by with food stamps.

The fee for a Connecticut massage therapist license is $380, but Olea does not know what additional training she might need. Her calls to a government assistance hotline have not turned up anyone who could explain in Spanish how to proceed.

Kimberly Hernandez, 23, from San Juan, spent two years and several thousand dollars on her training as an emergency medical technician before moving to the mainland after the hurricane. She is researching how to obtain additional training to qualify for a Connecticut license. A single mother, she has been staying at a Hartford hotel with federal housing benefits that expire later this month as she searches for employment of any kind at restaurants, factories, nursing homes.

“If I don’t find work, I may need to go to a shelter with my baby,” she said.

For those whose homes were flooded or damaged, it can be a challenge to gather the documents needed even to apply for job licenses. At the Nueva Esperanza advocacy group in Holyoke, Massachusetts, executive director Nelson Roman said the agency routinely helps storm-displaced people with money orders to Puerto Rico agencies to secure replacement birth certificates and other paperwork.

“Those are the constant daily hiccups we find,” he said.

While the influx of people since the hurricane has brought new attention to the requirements that vary by state, they have been a source of frustration for others who had been relocating from the island in growing numbers. Yanil Teron, director of the Center for Latino Progress in Hartford, said teachers from out of state in particular have had difficulty earning licenses in Connecticut.

“They don’t want to recognize it although they’ve gone through the same education,” she said. “It’s Connecticut protecting I don’t know who but they are protecting other communities.”


Tom-mills
Common Cents
Tom and John Mills' Common Cents: To refinance or not to refinance?

In the first quarter of 2018, the refinance share of home loan applications in the U.S. fell to 40 percent, the lowest in 10 years. Higher mortgage rates had reduced demand for refinances.

Still, the refinance is not exactly dead.

If you have good credit, you may be considering refinancing yourself, for one or more reasons. Perhaps you want to shorten the term of your home loan. Maybe you have an adjustable-rate mortgage now and want to refinance into a fixed rate. Alternatively, you may want to tap into home equity or consolidate debt.

Whatever your reason(s), you must weigh two questions.

One, how long do you want to stay in your home?

Two, how much money will you save?

Refinances break down into three types: rate-and-term, cash-out, and cash-in.

Rate-and-term refinances simply adjust the term and the interest rate of your existing loan.

Even though interest rates are rising now, they still make up the bulk of refinances. The no-cash-out variety adds closing costs to the loan balance, relieving you from having to pay those costs out of pocket.

A cash-out refinance gives you an opportunity to tap home equity and pay off your existing mortgage. In a cash-out mortgage, the loan balance on the refinance is at least 5 percent more than the balance on the original loan.

As you owe the balance of your original loan to the lender, the overage is either paid out as cash at closing or routed to your creditors to help you whittle down other debts.

A cash-in refinance is the inverse of a cash-out refinance.

You bring cash to the closing to lower the outstanding principal of the loan, under a shorter loan term or a lower interest rate available at lower loan-to-values (LTVs).

You may be able to cancel mortgage insurance premium payments as part of the move (i.e., by reducing a conventional mortgage to 80 percent LTV or lower).

In ballpark terms, the answer is often $2,000-$10,000. In percentage terms, think 3 to 5 percent of the loan amount.

Certain closing costs may be negotiable, like app and processing fees.

If you are stretching the term of your loan out with a refinance, you will carry mortgage debt for years longer than you originally planned, complete with thousands more paid out in interest.

If you are using home equity to fund a remodel or upgrades, your home’s value may not rise as much as you anticipate from the work.

Then there are the little curveballs life throws at us, such as potential job changes and relocations.

If you sense you might have to move before you can recapture the closing costs of the refinance, is it even worth the trouble to try?

Hopefully, you will be able to lower the interest rate on your loan, shorten its term, or find a way to reduce your monthly payments through refinancing.

Online calculators and a conversation with a trusted mortgage professional may help you determine the potential break-even points for a refinance and find paths to a home loan more suitable to your needs.


Tom-mills
Common Cents
Tom and John Mills' Common Cents: Having patience

Very few personality traits will serve you better than patience.

Patience is a talent that can be practiced and cultivated. Those with patience will think long-term more than short-term. They will not let instant gratification get in the way of what they want.

Most worthwhile things in this life take time to accomplish or achieve.

That fact doesn’t bode well for many people who believe their pulse bestows the right to talents, wealth and attention.

Investing in yourself is a slow process, and the rewards come slowly. Education, dieting or learning a new talent of any type require patience.

In our high-speed lives, we often fall into the trap of expecting results immediately. Many people give up just before they see a reward.

In his fantastic book, “How Will You Measure Your Life,” Clay Christensen wrote, “if you study business disasters, over and over you’ll find a predisposition toward endeavors that offer immediate gratification over endeavors that result in long-term success.”

So it is with personal time and money.

Retirement saving or saving for any other reason is often hindered by those not willing to be patient. The numbers start small, and you need to expect that.

Learn to keep going when you get frustrated and want to quit. The miracle of compounding only works if you keep trying.

Investing rarely works well for those with no patience. An investing plan or strategy may take time to unfold, and all investors experience setbacks.

People with no patience will pull out at the worst time, often sabotaging their future.

When the market drops, do you see danger or potential? How you answer that question says a lot.

Warren Buffet said “the stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” When you run from a falling market, and that market subsequently rebounds you have given money to someone who is more patient than you.

Parents often feel the need to save for their children’s future.

Most often this takes the form of college and educational savings. It is easy to become demoralized when saving for college.

The inflation rate is much higher than traditional inflation. Books, room and board and fees all seem to make things impossible.

The truth is that most parents will never save all of their children’s educational costs, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t start.

Those who lack patience don’t only lose time. The impatient often create financial situations that make things even worse.

Overspending plagues those who require patience. The cliché: if you are not moving forward then you are moving backward, is especially true with the impatient.

People who lack patience usually suffer from an all-or-nothing mentality.

If they can’t achieve everything, then why try?

If they can’t save enough, why bother? If something is imperfect in any way, then it is a failure. This attitude is very detrimental to any aspect of progress.

You eventually need to realize that your best effort is good enough.