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James Mangold hates post-credit scenes Content Exchange

James Mangold finds post-credit sequences "f**king embarrassing".

The 54-year-old filmmaker recently helmed the R-rated 'X-Men' spin-off movie 'Logan', but even though his movie didn't have a post-credit scene - which has become a regular contribution to superhero films - Mangold has revealed his views on how he feels about the teasing of future films.

He vented: "Now we've actually gotten audiences addicted to a f***ing bonus in the credits. It's f***ing embarrassing. It means you couldn't land your f***ing movie, is what it means. Even if you got 100,000 Twitter addicts who are gambling on what f***ing scene is going to happen after the f***ing credits, it's still cheating.

"[Post-credits scenes are] selling them the next movie while you're making this movie, and kind of all that s**t that I find really f***ing embarrassing.

"Like, that audience are actually asking for scenes in the end credits when those scenes were first developed for movies that suck, so they put something extra at the end to pick up the scores when the movie couldn't end right on its own f***ing feet."

Now, after making these comments at the beginning of the month, Mangold took to Twitter this week to continue venting about the scenes which are so popular with cinema goers.

The director - who is currently making 'Captain Nemo' - wrote: "Many folks commented on my diatribe re: end credits scenes. Good points made by some who disagree. My vehemence comes from a belief these scenes r cinematic MSG/crack. Of course they feel good. They are designed to do that, like ads, as they hook you to buy the next film/s and at the same time, I feel like the omnipresent expectation of them cheapens the integrity of a theatrical experience as the movie doesn't stick its ending but rather dribbles to an end with a series of pleasing vignettes/ads for the thing they will sell you next year ... So its not so much the scenes I despise as much as I fear that movies (an art form I deeply love) are not advanced when they are no longer functioning as a form with a beginning middle and end but rather as part of a serialized money machine. These scenes promote a slightly false sense of fully realized "universe" as if everyone behind scenes knows exactly what's next in a saga, when the truth is a bit less charted despite what many tell a sycophantic press that makes $ on the "universes" & the gossip mill they create

"Lastly, the term "easter egg"'s a bit infantile &, at least 2 me, feels condescending toward a thoughtful & intellectual audience that might be treated w/ more respect than imagining them as kids jumping around trying to guess storylines from breadcrumbs dropped by corporations.

"One more thing. The argument that these scs. make people watch end credits is just lame.

"If you have to offer shiny objects to keep people watching the names of the crew, then they are not showing an ounce of respect for the crew. Just waiting like dogs for milk bones. [sic]"

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