Three Jesse Bethel High School seniors were accepted during a Nov. 1 recruitment event at Napa Valley College to Harris-Stowe State University, one of two dozen historically black universities visiting the campus. Picture are, L-R, Rachel Leguie, university admissions counselor Nakeyah Bradford, Katrina Fragher and Faith Goodwin.

Three Jesse Bethel High School seniors were accepted during a Nov. 1 recruitment event at Napa Valley College to Harris-Stowe State University, one of two dozen historically black universities visiting the campus. Pictured left to right, Rachel Leguie, university admissions counselor Nakeyah Bradford, Katrina Fragher and Faith Goodwin.

Napa Valley College

Napa Valley College invited local college and high school students to campus on Nov. 1 to meet representatives of two dozen historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

More than 300 students attended this event, part of the California Community Colleges Transfer Guarantee program, in which community college students who complete certain academic requirements are guaranteed transfer to 35 participating HBCUs.

Several HBCU colleges offered on-site admissions and full-ride tuition scholarships at the event.

While only about 17 percent of black undergraduate students attend an HBCU, more than 28 percent of African-Americans who earn bachelor’s degrees obtain them from an HBCU.

Many HBCUs are highly ranked and all are open to students of all ethnicities. There are more than 100 HBCUs in the nation, with most located in the South and on the East Coast.

Many students, including three seniors from Jesse Bethel High School in Vallejo, were accepted for admission at the NVC event.

“I wanted to find a prosthesis nursing program, and Nakeyah Bradford from Harris-Stowe State University told us about how fun and interesting her college is, and how chill it is,” said Faith Goodwin, one of the students who was admitted on the spot.

Rachel Leguie, who was also admitted, said Bradford described the campus as a place with home-style values, “where I would survive culturally.”

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Katrina Fragher, also admitted, said she was looking to be accepted at a college with a “smaller, close-knit campus.”

Bradford said Harris-Stowe has about 1,500 students, with classes averaging 10 students per class and a 14:1 teacher-to-student ratio, Bradford said.

“The opportunity to host the regional California Community College HBCU event at NVC provided a great opportunity for our local students to be exposed to many highly ranked colleges,” said Howard Willis, NVC’s dean of counseling services and student success.

“The HBCU representatives were very pleased with the quality and number of students they met, as well as the opportunity to educate students, faculty and staff about HBCU higher education opportunities.

“I was excited to see students realize that they were academically eligible and prepared to attend these four-year colleges and universities. In the students’ eyes, you could see a dream come true.”

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