When Napa resident Kathleen Wolf returned to her Randolph Street home in April, following a three-month trip to France, she was surprised to see a newly installed 55-foot-tall radio antenna towering above her fence in a neighbor’s backyard.

“That’s the last thing I want to look at,” said Wolf, whose historic home has been in her family for four generations. “What if it falls on me while I’m tending to my tomatoes? I, at least, want to know that it’s safe.”

About six weeks ago, Jeff Hullquist, a Coombs Street resident, erected the amateur, or ham, radio antenna at his home. He grounded the enormous, metal structure in 30,000 pounds of cement and attached it to the side of his house using temporary mounts.

“I had a state-licensed contractor install it,” Hullquist said Monday. “It’s not like I just put it up myself.”

And while some residents in the Napa Abajo-Fuller Park Historic District might think the antenna is an “eyesore” that takes away from the district’s ambiance, there may be little they can do to force Hullquist to remove it.

“Federal law is very specific in protecting the rights of amateur radio operators,” said Robert Reber, a senior planner with the city of Napa. “It was installed without a building or use permit, both of which are required because it’s a transmitting structure. But the (Federal Communications Commission) usually regulates this, so local control is often preempted by federal regulations.”

Ham radio is a popular hobby in America that consists of licensed amateur radio operators, or hams, who communicate over the airwaves. Ham operators are required to pass an exam given by the FCC to obtain a license to access amateur radio frequencies, known as bands. The FCC reserves these bands for ham radio operators and has strict laws protecting citizens’ rights to use the airwaves.

Ham radio is also prized in emergencies as means of communication if cellular or Internet service is knocked out. Local towns often train volunteers to become ham operators in case of a significant disaster.

Hullquist has been a ham radio enthusiast for years. He started with an old citizens band, or CB, radio in the 1970s, when his uncle got him interested in the pastime.

“In case of a disaster, it’s a public service,” said Hullquist. “Yes, it’s a hobby, but if there’s an earthquake where cell and Internet service is out — who do you think will be the first people at my door, wanting to use my radio to contact their loved ones? The exact same neighbors who are complaining about me.”

Recently, Hullquist filed a building and use permit application with the city’s planning department, to come into compliance with city laws requiring permits for transmitting structures. Reber said staff is reviewing the materials and will most likely need additional information about the safety and installation of the antenna.

“After that, the matter will most likely go before the Planning Commission,” said Reber. “We always encourage citizens or anyone installing something to first check with the city to make sure the applicable codes and regulations are followed. But ultimately, this will be up to the Planning Commission.”

Wolf, who recently sent a letter of concern to the city that was signed by several Randolph Street residents, said that she doesn’t want to infringe on Hullquist’s rights. But she worries about the stability of the tower.

“It’s a colossal radio antenna that could fall or have environmental impacts,” she said last week. “This is a historic district and it is terrible to look at.”

Stacey De Shazo, a preservationist with Napa County Landmarks, said she has spoken to city staff about the antenna, but is currently unaware of any codes that would ban such installations.

“We’re still researching the matter, but it would be a shame if people put these huge antennas up all over historic districts,” she said. “The city may have to try and legislate this type of thing.”

Hullquist’s application is winding its way through the city’s permitting department and will likely appear before the Planning Commission soon. He said that he spent $500 on the building permit and could be forced to spend more, if the city wants to discourage him.

“I’m trying to comply with what the city wants,” he said, as he sat before several radios set up in an office at his home — his fingers continually turning a large radio dial, scanning different frequencies, picking up conversations throughout the globe. “I know I’m in good shape to keep it because the FCC protects amateur radio operators. But it’s a question of how much work and money it will be.”

(67) comments

diegomayra
diegomayra

I love enjoying beautiful Napa valley for its charm, wonderful weather, vistas, and wine and food; but let's be practical.

I'm no HAM operator, I'm not even remotely knowledgeable on the details. What I do know is that the Federal Govt saw a need to develop these forms of radio usage and make stringent licensing for the benefit of the public.

There are numerous cases when HAM was used to assist local govt, first responders, red Cross, etc. One major case was the Boston bombing...

As soon as the bombs were detonated cell phone and other methods of communication were severed... It is here where a professional civic-minded "Amateur" radio operator can relay information above statuses and other crucial information.

I support this man. It's a blessing... Not a curse

MichaelSancto
MichaelSancto

my additional concern would electromagnetic health hazard to neighbors. high level of electromagnetic radio wave are suspected to cause cancers. FCC still allowing Ham Radio operators to radiate as much as 1500 watts into open air. As comparison, Microwave Oven which are also electromagnetic radiated device operate around 800 watts, but in enclosed metal case. cell phone are tightly regulated and tested for safety before they can be sold in US , and they are less than 0.5 watt. 1500 watts limits are set more than 40 years ago, when we did now know much about health hazard of electromagnetic wave.

Mary W0AAT

Ham radio operators are required to do a study each year to make sure their antennas are placed in such a way that they do NOT cause any health issues. At the frequencies hams use 1500 watts is not going to fry you like a microwave oven could. I do not see any microwave antennas(hams have frequencies from just above AM broadcast to light including many in the microwave region) on his tower so the very upper frequency concerns do not come into play.

radioman

Way to get all Sebastopol-dumb on this issue.

There are plenty of studies - hundreds from every decade, that have identified that RF - non-ionizing radiation - is much, much different in its effect that ionizing radiation. Yet, you roll out the typical Sebastopol smart meter line that its cancer causing. So science is good if it fits your facts, but "unsure" or "incomplete" if it doesn't? Wow. Just wow.

Glassguy

If someone gave you a nazi flag would you display it ?????
just wondering

Wj

Define display.
Put it up on a flagpole in front of the house and honor it? Of course not.
As part of a collection of flags from different areas and countries past or present, of course. There is nothing wrong with the study of history.

Major
Major

If it's the last thing you want to look at, don't look at it.

Bill O'Reilly

What about the communist flag in the back of this picture? We should probably be more concerned about that.

Wj

Yes, what about that flag, it is part of a flag collection. That particular one was given as a gift upon the demise of the Berlin Wall. Across the room from it is an Israeli flag, shall we condemn it also? If the comments above had been read this explanation would have been seen and maybe your comment not been made. I see nothing wrong with a person having a collection as a hobby as it is good for the soul. I also look at the fact that all of them are displayed as a collection inside of the house and not being put on display outside. If that flag were to be displayed on a pole out front of his house I'm quite sure Mr. Hullquist and I would be having words at the very least.

I reiterate my earlier comments, Check something out and get the facts before assuming that you know the facts, and making a mountain from a molehill. Chances are that you really do not have all the true information.

woody

I had the same problem with neighbors not liking my ham radio tower, i explained to them that i could crank it down but the RF radiation could damage their dna and cause cancer so they said get it back up as high as possible.

napahighfan

At least if E.T. Ever decides to phone home he has a place to call.,

Really napa

Really?? "While returning from my 3 month trip to France" I saw an antenna and it could fall on me while tending to tomatoes??????

If it falls on you your neighbor can call for help on the radio and reach mars!

truthandreality

MARS, the Military Auxiliary Radio System. A volunteer service that requires an Amateur and MARS license to handle welfare and disaster messages for the US military using military radio frequencies. MARS license hanging on the wall by my ham and commercial licenses.

JustNapa
JustNapa

I stand corrected in the amateur radio arena. My facts are based on commercial and industrial structures, with a Commercial Operators License. Regarding the tower lighting, please re-read my comment - I said "IF" this tower were 200 feet, the FAA lighting requirement would apply. As a pilot also, as one other here mentioned that they are as well, when I mention the controlled airspace surrounding Napa Airport on a sectional chart, I am more loosely referring to the "five miles out" range. As I was brought up and continued in the commercial and industrial telecommunications industry, I did not get involved in amateur radio. However, don't get me wrong. I had an uncle and other family members that were ham operators. As far as the comments relating to safety: ALL forms of communication available in the event of a crisis are assets. Although there are many redundant systems with diesel generator backup power for days, our infrastructure always remains vulnerable.

Wj

Just Napa cont…
5. You state the tower is attached to the house, sadly, wrong again. By driving by and looking, you would have seen the attachment wires are actually another antenna. This is called a long wire antenna and is a very common type of antenna design. It supports nothing and has no bearing in a discussion of structure.
In reading this article, I see many kinds of hysteria, name calling, misquotes, and assumption without any true knowledge of fact emanating from many sources. I see many comments of “Why couldn’t he have talked to his neighbors first?” Ok, I ask the same question, Why couldn’t any of the complaining (spelled whining) parties have contacted him with their concerns? I guess it is just better/easier to cry poor me.

I am not familiar with Napa's building codes, but I'm sure they are very clear concise and will be applied fairly after they have been researched properly.

Wj

Just Napa cont…
5. You state the tower is attached to the house, sadly, wrong again. By driving by and looking, you would have seen the attachment wires are actually another antenna. This is called a long wire antenna and is a very common type of antenna design. It supports nothing and has no bearing in a discussion of structure.
In reading this article, I see many kinds of hysteria, name calling, misquotes, and assumption without any true knowledge of fact emanating from many sources. I see many comments of “Why couldn’t he have talked to his neighbors first?” Ok, I ask the same question, Why couldn’t any of the complaining (spelled whining) parties have contacted him with their concerns? I guess it is just better/easier to cry poor me.
I’m not going to go into the emergency communication argument as history has already shown that evidence.
We have been thinking of purchasing property here in Napa, as it really is a beautiful area. But, I’m not really sure I want to spend my time around this many short sighted people.

Wj

Just Napa, You really should do a bit of research before making statements of fact, because like in this case. it isn't. Let's look at a few of them.
1. While the antenna system may have a lightning arrestor, the tower won't and shouldn't. IF we were to have a thunderstorm come through, you would want that tower to attract the lightning and dissipate the charge to the ground. This can and would be done with no damage to anything. Can that be said for your house? The answer is no.
2. Your statements regarding radio station certification will apply to commercial installations which this is not.
3. The location of this tower is outside the controlled airspace of the Napa County Airport. This is clearly depicted by the aviation charts issued by the FAA. Yes, I have these charts as I am a pilot.
4. Yes a monopole is required to have guy wire support, BUT, this is a freestanding tower and not a monopole and thus not required for guy wire support. Look to Kennedy Park for a monopole example.

Wj

Just Napa cont…
5. You state the tower is attached to the house, sadly, wrong again. By driving by and looking, you would have seen the attachment wires are actually another antenna. This is called a long wire antenna and is a very common type of antenna design. It supports nothing and has no bearing in a discussion of structure.
In reading this article, I see many kinds of hysteria, name calling, misquotes, and assumption without any true knowledge of fact emanating from many sources. I see many comments of “Why couldn’t he have talked to his neighbors first?” Ok, I ask the same question, Why couldn’t any of the complaining (spelled whining) parties have contacted him with their concerns? I guess it is just better/easier to cry poor me.

CaptinKirk
CaptinKirk

The FCC is NOT required to do field testing before anything is transmitted in regards to Amateur Radio Equipment. Commercial radio equipment is different than amateur radio towers and do not follow under the same rules. Perhaps if you would get your amateur radio licence you would know that. Also, FAA regulations only cover towers over 200 feet. Under 200 feet is fair game and falls under county regulations, and for TV and Ham Radio Towers. Attaching the tower to a structure is permitted when it comes to Ham radio towers and tv towers because once again they are not commercial structures.

Anyone can have a spectrum analyzer and I highly doubt that your dad is with the FCC. Also to the person that said their family doesn't live near an amateur radio operator is an idiot. Hams are all over the place. Perhaps you all should thank a ham as this is a prime example of the services hams provides. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDrI_Ebx8YM The emergency aspect is not overrated!

truthandreality

JustNapa... In Part 97 of the FCC rules that govern Amateur service there are no requirements for any signage or any FCC conducted RF studies. The tower is far enough away from the airport, and hot high enough for FAA tower certification. If the tower was designed for use without guy (not "guide") wires, as it appears this was, they are not required.

Oh, and many hams have spectrum analyzers and calibrated field strength meters. Fairly common test equipment these days for the more advanced Amateur operator that does design and engineering work.

As one who is up with current FCC regulations, and works in this field professionally, dealing with both public safety and ham radio, there are no violations of FCC rules here.

JustNapa
JustNapa

There are far more regulations than at the local, City level. There are two Federal entities involved. First, with the FCC. You must have an Operator's license, signage of Tx and Rx frequencies and wattage being transmitted at. The FCC is required to do field testing before anything is transmitted, in order to certify that it does not cause interference with any other communication infrastructures. Second entity is the FAA. This tower is within the controlled airspace of Napa Airport. If this tower were 200 feet tall, it would be required to have a red blinking strobe light at the top of it. Now, a general contractor is not licensed to erect towers, unless he is a C-10 contractor, at the very minimum. Any monopole tower, such as this one, is required to be supported by guide wires - it's a huge no-no to attach it to a structure. I grew up going with my Dad (Senior RF Engineer) to all the major Bay Area comm sites. He's lives here, has a spectrum analyzer, and he's with the FCC.

Mary W0AAT

Ham radio operators work under different rules than commercial so what you posted is wrong. I transmit on frequencies from 1.8mhz all the way to 1.2ghz. All I have to do to be in compliance is a self review of power levels and safe operating practices regarding how close a person can be to the transmitting antenna.

And that tower is what they refer to as a self supporting crank up. It lowers to 22 feet when not in use and does not require any guying. And bracketed towers with the house as a support are very common in ham radio. I have 2 of them. FAA regs only come into play of you are in the glide slope of the airport, not just because you live nearish to one.

CmdrBuzz

You are speaking of commercial radio operations, amateur radio has a different set of FCC rules. Do some research.

radioman

Just like the others said, check your facts. You are wrong on every one of your statements.

rocketman
rocketman

Put some fake tree branches on the tower and no one will notice it.........

Ron McKernan

Since it's a historic district, perhaps an antenna more inline with the times would be more appealing to the neighbors.

Here's a photo of an amateur radio antenna from 1915:

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/61/d6/44/61d644710cb82367eca0033cd3b6fd2f.jpg


FireEater

Dear Ms. Complainer and related folks, there may soon come a day when this city experiences a catastrophic event that will render your phone and cell services "out of service" for a period of time and you will be dang glad you have a neighbor that HAS a way to communicate with the world and could very well come in vary handy to you and others in your neighborhood. You need to consider the possibilities before you go making big waves. Get over yourself!

Crosscountrykid
Crosscountrykid

So when this catastrophic event occurs of the magnitude you imagine, who you gonna contact for help-some ham in Sheboygan? Call me crazy, but somehow I think if we went through an event of such magnitude, someone on the outside would already know about it. We have already survived the Schwarzenegger administration, you know. What else could be worse? But seriously, you hams should link up with those Christians who believe the end times are just around the corner. You both seem to prophet from this agenda of Armageddon. Meanwhile, have the simple courtesy to let your neighbors in on your next eyesore. Gotta run. I think I hear that killer asteroid approaching.

rocketman
rocketman

What else could be worse you say?? How about "trying" to survive the Obama Administration!

rocketman
rocketman

The whole issue will be old news in a couple of weeks. Looks like Mr. Hullquist followed all the laws and procedures.

KK7YC

Perhaps the City of Napa should familiarize themselves with their on ordinances: Napa Municipal Code 17.52.480 Telecommunication facilities.

A. Purpose. The city seeks to ensure a broad range of competitive telecommunication services while minimizing visual blight from such facilities by encouraging screened, low visibility locations on buildings, or other low visibility design solutions. Stand alone towers, if allowed, will need to minimize height to the maximum extent feasible, and provide appropriate colors, type and screening.

B. Definition and Applicability. For purposes of this section, a telecommunication facility is defined as a facility that transmits and/or receives electromagnetic signals. It includes antennas, microwave dishes, horns, and other types of equipment for the transmission or receipt of such signals, telecommunication towers or similar structures supporting said equipment, equipment buildings and related accessory development. A telecommunication facility is a public, quasi-public communications use that requires a use permit in any district, except as provided in subsection C.

C. Exempt from City Review. The following accessory telecommunication uses shall be permitted without city permits.

1. Citizens band and amateur radio systems used by amateur radio operators which existed at time of the adoption of this chapter; and new CB and ARS systems not exceeding the height limit of the district in which they are located are considered to be permitted accessory uses not subject to this section.

itsez2throstonz

It appears to read, "...which existed at time of the adoption of this code" (it was just installed) and "...not exceeding the height limit of the district" (what are the chances the district allows 55' tall structures?).

radioman

How about this: What are the chances the FCC allows 200' towers if more than a mile from an airport? Better brush up on your laws. Particularly the federal ones.

Stephanie Elise
Stephanie Elise

On the topic of the "commie flag", my dad has a collection of vintage flags and this specific flag was from the fall of the Berlin wall given to him as a gift in the mid 90's. I don't understand why its such a problem. It represents the freedom after the fall of the USSR.

n0grv
n0grv

that tower and antenna is a beautiful thing. would love to have it in my yard. and yess get rid of the flag

DiyalaScout
DiyalaScout

Whoah. Instead of the antennae....how 'bout you take down that commie flag? :)

He's right....same neighbors will be loving the fact he's got that in an emergency....not only for family, but safety as well. Any communication will be needed. I have a CB in the garage...sometimes I put it on my truck. Wife makes fun of it...but she'll be glad we have it in case of no comm's with anyone.

But yeah....that flag's gotta go.

napahighfan

Funny how things have changed. Before cable TV everyone had a similar ugly antenna on there property and no one thought twice about it. My grandpas house had one that rivaled the one in this article no one complained and I guarantee it wasnt set in concrete. He had the best reception in the neighborhood.Obviously in most cases not as tall but in today's world it's a reason to complain.

Vita

Who, in this day of internet and social media, still uses a Ham radio? So many other things in life to worry about.

Mary W0AAT

USA has around 750,000 ham radio operators...

radioman

And if your internet goes down, how does your social media and email work? Radio always works.

selim_sivad
selim_sivad

I love the justification: "What if there's an emergency? THEN you'll want my HAM radio to contact your loved ones!" Er, no, I won't, because nobody in my family lives anywhere near an amateur radio operator and we're not going to queue up in the hopes that my parents are going to just happen to be "on the air" when we are there.

I think the fact that he didn't notify his neighbors ahead of time shows knowledge that he either knew that it was going to be an eyesore and would rather beg forgiveness after the fact, or he's just so monumentally selfish that he doesn't care if the surrounding property values go down because, quite frankly, who wants to buy a house next to a five-story tall giant antenna?

Coombs certainly has its share of eyesores along there and a giant antenna doesn't help things. Doesn't the fact that it's anchored to the side of his house present additional code issues?

radioman

You so sure about your statement? No one in your family lives nowhere near a ham? Check again. I'd bet you'll find different.

5th Generation Napan
5th Generation Napan

Typical, this whole thing gets blown up (even though it may be legal) because someone doesn't have the courtesy to just talk to his neighbors before hand about his plans and their concerns. It may be legal but its also UN-neighborly to shove something like this down someones throat with no warning. Their seems to be no attempt by anyone to be courteous today!

Alexgirl

I think this is a hideous monstrosity, but what someone does with their own property is really none of our business. This giant metal structure, that juts off this guy's house is apparently legal. If you want to live in a community where you get to call the shots for your neighbors, you will have to live in some type of gated, sanitized complex. There are homes that I don't necessarily like the looks of in my neighborhood, and I'm sure some of my neighbors don't like my taste, but that's too bad, because we can only control what's on our own property.

napablogger
napablogger

Right, so anyone should be able to do anything they want in a neighborhood, chemical factory, gas station, rock band practice studio, etc. Not. These private property rights arguments look further and further from reality to me all the time.

Alexgirl

Napablogger, as I was writing my comment, I was laughing to myself, because I knew that I sounded like some Tea Party hack. You make a good points, but I don't think a chemical factory, or a gas station would be aloud in a residential neighborhood, and there are noise ordinances for loud music. I do enjoy music, so I'm not sure that would bother me, unless it was country. My point was, we do have rights to our own bad taste, on our own property.

ldillon

I think many people don't realize that because of the physics of radio waves, the antenna size must be matched to the frequency in use. Amateur radio uses very long wavelengths for world-wide communication. A smaller antenna will either work very poorly or not at all.

Crosscountrykid
Crosscountrykid

In this day and age of satellites and all else, IMO the emergency role of hams is highly overrated. We recently got through a few earthquakes and floods without needing hams. Of course, all this emergency stuff has nothing to do with someone putting up a tower of this height in a neighborhood of this character. If ham operators value communication so much, Mr. Hullquist's failure to communicate with those so close to his eyesore is a failure to communicate of the first magnitude-not to mention discourteous, insensitive, and judging from his comments, a bit arrogant.

KK7YC

Just wait 'til the Sh... really hits the fan! Your cell phone, internet, electric grid, and satellite service will not work. Trust me, it will be ham operators that will be the first ones to establish communications, and for the Emergency Services Folks.

Crosscountrykid
Crosscountrykid

So please provide a few examples over the last 15-20 yrs. in Ca when all communications failed and hams saved the day. We've had flood, fires, earthquakes, etc. And if you're going to play the "wait until the day comes...", well let's just ramp the speculation all the way up to a killer asteroid zooming in on earth. Sorry, KK7YC, I don't live my life in constant fear. And again, the Armageddon argument is a red herring. This is about a 50 ft. tower in a residential neighborhood. Plain and simple, it's an unjustified eyesore.

napablogger
napablogger

Yes, ham radios will save us when an earthquake destroys Napa which has happened...NEVER.

CmdrBuzz

October 17, 1989 a 7.1 mag quake hit the San Francisco area knocking out power to SF and the city was dark for the first time since the 1906 quake. There was no telephone service into or out of the city. Other means of commercial communications were knocked out. Even news services could not get any kind of communications into or out of the city. At the company where I worked near Dallas, TX, there were several company employees from SF in a training school. They could not get any word of the safety of their families. I was asked if I could use my ham radio to find out any information. I went home and made contact with another ham in SF running on emergency power. As some local telco exchanges were operating he could make some local calls. I gave him the numbers of the people concerned and was able to verify that all were OK. How does that work for you?

radioman

The Loma Preita Earthquake is one example of ham radio helping. The hurricane in the Philippines recently is another. As is Katrina, Hugo and a bunch of all the other natural disasters. Name a disaster and you'll find hams there. And you'll find hams, in various areas - including Napa, Sonoma, Schellville, Petaluma, American Canyon, Graton and other way out places providing communications.

Some times it takes a person hundreds of miles away to provide help - because they are not in an area that has also been hit with disaster.

Talk to the local FEMA volunteers that routinely go out to help - they'll tell you they rely on hams to help out with communications.

Mary W0AAT

In the MN floods of 1997 Cell service, landline service, and quite a few public service radio sites went down because water got into a major telephone exchange. I spent 2 weeks running ham radio messages in and out of the area and many went to people who never thought a ham lived nearby. Messages get passed down and a ham with a handheld radio could have been the final one to deliver it to the person it was addressed to. You would never know they were a ham, they have no antenna or a very simple antenna that is unobtrusive and overlooked because it is a vertical pole.

truthandreality

When it comes to ham radio, you should be grateful if you have a ham in your neighborhood. Hams can provide communications across town or around the world at any time of day or night. When a disaster strikes, your cell phone and internet will not work. The cell system is not as robust as many think, and will fail as seen with wide area blackouts, earthquakes, and severe weather.

It is important to note that Amateur Radio is regulated and licensed by the Federal government intended to provide for public service and development of new technology. Almost all of our wireless devices are based in innovation by hams. This is all done with a large financial, outlay by hams, with it being illegal for them to receive any compensation for their work. Many hams provide radio networks that rival the best law and fire radio systems. Congress has provided, through PRB-1, to protect hams form City and State regulations.

No fees for burden should be assessed one someone providing a public service.

SHNVGIRL

Just quit complaining and get over it already. Some people just want something to complain about, obviously she wants attention with her picture included in the article. You're really worried about the thing falling on you while gardening? Lol.

Locust55

I wouldn't want it looming over me either. Visually it's commercial, not residential. In an earthquake, who knows?

Major
Major

I know. It's so hard to see through this tower. It might block the moon.

alisaham

Federal regulations, specifically PRB-1, address the legality of ham towers and antennas. Additionally California government code section 65850.3 spells out that city and county regulations conform to the FCC laws. Finally Napa city code reads in part as follows:CITY OF NAPA CODE
17.52.480 Telecommunication facilities
C. Exempt from City Review. The following accessory telecommunication uses shall be permitted without city permits. 1 Citizens band amateur radio systems used by amateur radio operators and which existed at time of the adoption of this chapter; and new CB and ARS systems not exceeding the height limit of the district in which they are located are considered to be permitted accessory uses not subject to this section.
It seems to me if Mr Hullquist paid money for a permit, the city should give it back.

Crypto21

Aside of the structural concerns, the fact remains the tower requires a discretionary use permit. As such, the concerns of the neighbors have a right to be addressed. It's concerning that a law enforcement officer should be so bold as to infringe on the property rights of neighbors by constructing the tower without permits. If I were a neighbor, I would be concerned of property devaluation caused by the tower in a historic district, not to mention placing a 55 foot tall lighting rod in a populated neighborhood.

JustNapa
JustNapa

Good point - do we know, or can we see, if this tower has lightning arrester(s) near the top of it?

RedRyder
RedRyder

Mr. Hullquist you have my support as a fellow radio operator. But, you could've at least given your neighbors a heads up and explain to them the benefits of amature radio in time of crisis or disaster.

Major
Major

When he put the tower up, their heads went up. So they had the heads up after the fact. What's the difference?

QofV63baby

30,000 lbs of cement, where in the world can it go? And NapaMark15, what does the type of vehicle he drives, while performing his job, matters?
Why is it that any form of entertainment, which doesn't have to do with wine or food consumption, is a crime..
I wonder, if the person complaining, had a family member that was a ham radio operator or if she needed the help of a Ham operator, if she may have a different opinion of the antenna
Napa will never change!

mattsmom2u2
mattsmom2u2

thank you Mr Hullquist what you and my Dad kenneth wing do is life saving I think that negates the tower size wouldnt you, , many many times operators like him my dad and so many others have helped to save many lives as a retired parmedic I can tell you that at times ham operators saved lives when radio communications failed for us,, mammamperhaps youcan see it in that light ,

Farmsteader
Farmsteader

55ft sized Tower with so much Cement is very adequate , I know of many Hams who have 75- 99Ft Antennas , Those locals should be happy he was conservative about it , and look at the actual antenna it is not a multi element beam type but a simple looking antenna.
many times so call historical districts are just old looking homes , i am surprised there are not more Ham Antennas there . I am glad we moved from Calif. Frankly , no HOAs no city Bull , i can even park my Truck on my own Grass . At least when i hear Gun Shots now they are not from Crime but Hunting and sighting in a rifle scope . you look up Ham Operators have helped in running or racing events , Emergencies , and even in WWll , where do you think Cell Towers came from ? Yes Ham Radio Repeaters experiments, and Hams have sent up communication Satellites . Just do some searching and see all the advances from Hams experimenting . As an Antenna Lightening Rod - this is ignorant -that antenna is grounded from others being hit.

HumanWheatley

I totally agree. It really isn't a big deal. (I live right behind Jeff's house, so I know.)

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
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