Jerry Sax, Gus Amador, Mark Amador and myself recently made a trip to Legacy Lodge in British Columbia, Canada. The lodge is about 250 miles north of Vancouver and it requires three plane trips to get there, as there is nothing between the lodge and wilderness for hundreds of miles. First stop is Vancouver, then Harding Point, and finally a float plane to the lodge.

Upon landing, the guests are welcomed by lodge owner Phil Dawson, and the nicest group of employees you would ever want to meet. Your luggage is taken to your room, where warm jackets, rain gear and boots are waiting for you. Next up is a group seminar where all the amenities of the lodge are laid out, plus how, when and where to catch both salmon and halibut. Then a trip on a boat in the harbor with a guide explaining the proper method of presenting the bait, how deep, speed, etc. Then is it on to a delicious dinner. And believe me, the chefs know what makes the old belly happy. By the end of dinner, usually around 9 to 9:30 p.m., everyone is ready to hit the sack.

First day, everyone is ready to go by 6 a.m., having already filled bellies with a good breakfast. Then everyone fills their pockets with all kind of cookies, apple fritters and other kinds of goodies. Fill the coffee pots, get in the boats, and travel single-file to the fishing grounds for the start of absolutely great fishing. There are about five guides, and their job is to make you happy and catch fish. They will get on your boat at your request and show you exactly how it should be done. Anyone requesting assistance only need ask and they are right there.

About 10 a.m., breakfast is brought out to your boat along with coffee and sodas, and they check if you need more bait. About 2 p.m., the lunch boat shows up and again, a check to see if more bait is needed. Breakfast is a big burrito or ham, egg and cheese sandwich. Lunch is a big sandwich, candy bars, chips, sodas and coffee, if you want.

At the end of the day the dock boys unload your fish, weigh each one, and post the weights under your name on a big scoreboard. Again, a delicious dinner is at 7 p.m. Then the good fellowship starts, with the outrageous lies about the big one that got away and all sorts of tales of what should, could and would have been if the angels would have only tapped us on the shoulder.

When fishing Canada, you are almost assured of catching all the fish allowed and with our group, we did just that. We didn’t get into the huge King salmon, but we did score with an 18-pound Coho salmon and a 56-pound halibut. All the fish we wanted every day. What a great. Final tally: five boxes totaling about 200 pounds for the four of us. We had an absolutely great time, and our memory banks are full of fish, great friends and the laughter we had. Waiting for next year.

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