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Janet Peischel's The Internet Marketer: How my videographer client increased revenue by 20%
The Internet Marketer

Janet Peischel's The Internet Marketer: How my videographer client increased revenue by 20%

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Janet Peischel

Janet Peischel

I encourage my clients to use case studies to showcase their expertise, but I forget to do this for myself!

So I’m profiling my work with a videographer. We increased his business by 20% in six months.

This guy is a perfectionist who takes a lot of pride in his work. He had previously worked in website design, so his site was well developed and integrated, and his videos were terrific.

What was missing: Content

People ignore the fact that content is what helps us show up in search engines.

All these conversations about keywords?

They’re the fundamental building blocks for search. And this guy is a filmmaker, not a writer.

What I would write in a simple sentence takes him a paragraph. For many people, being able to both see and read something enhances comprehension.

The scope of our work: Bringing some discipline to his marketing efforts.

We:

  • Synched the banners on all of his social media accounts.
  • Began doing a monthly newsletter, featuring one of his recent photo shoots
  • Fleshed out the About and profile fields on his social media sites, making sure we were using his keywords.

People often overlook the fact that you can have a LinkedIn company page as well as your profile page, and that you can post your blogs to LinkedIn.

  • Developed landing page content for each kind of video he produces—streaming, training and promotional. We explained how he works with his clients.
  • Began posting regularly to his social media sites, at least twice per week. Instagram was easy, immediate and a natural for him.

Focus on the video subject, not his equipment

Several of his clients were nonprofits funded by Silicon Valley heavyweights who were supporting social causes.

He would be filming these interesting, accomplished people, and when he’d do a screengrab image for his monthly newsletter or social media post? The image would be of him and his equipment.

I finally convinced him that the only people interested in his equipment are other videographers.

Videos are is a wonderful medium for connecting, for sharing stories and reaching an audience on an emotional level, so we wanted to leverage that.

We identified a workable formula

Once we got all of our communication channels updated and the foundation laid, we reached a formula that worked for us and increased his business by 20%. He would send/text me a few notes from a photo shoot, often during a break while it was still fresh on his mind. Sometimes he’d send some photos and screengrabs.

This was plenty of information for me to create fun, interesting blogs and posts. This required a minimal effort from me, so we kept this affordable.

We posted the blogs to his website, Linkedin and Blogger. Shorter posts and images for Facebook and Instagram.

After a few months of consistent effort, we began getting traction from these efforts—a steady stream of calls kept him booked.

Is it time to bring some discipline to your own marketing efforts? I would love to talk with you!Watch now: explaining California’s new gig worker labor law:

Contact Janet at 510-292-1843 or jpeischel@top-mindmarketing.com.

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