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When it comes to working out, Colleen O’Ferrall-Jones is interested in more than just what you can see in the mirror.

She and two business partners, Craig and Jennifer Nordby, have opened an Orangetheory Fitness franchise gym in Napa to offer workout classes designed to make you feel better, give you more energy and make you healthier. That they also help you lose weight and fit better in your clothes is a byproduct, she said.

O’Ferrall-Jones is confident in the results because of the science-based approach Orangetheory takes to fitness, she said. Through heart-rate monitoring, interval training and a high level of education for coaches, it offers its members a systematic approach that avoids over or under training and hits on all muscle groups.

“We can make sure they work out at a level that can change the body,” O’Ferrall-Jones said. “In that way, we can scale it to all fitness levels and all goals.”

Orangetheory is a global brand that has about 1,500 studios in 25 countries worldwide. It offers high-intensity, interval training classes led by trained coaches.

Every studio receives the same daily work out designed through a rigorous process at the corporate headquarters in Florida. That consistency of the workouts, brand image and the likeness of all the franchises is by design, O’Ferrall-Jones said.

“The brand is very consistent. We are really proud of that. We want the brand to feel and look the same way wherever you go,” she said. “You have a lot of community and a place to rally around when you have something that is consistent.”

Coaches must be certified personal trainers and audition to become certified Orangetheory coaches. Once accepted, they must participate in continuing education through Orangetheory’s Orange University.

O’Ferrall-Jones is originally from Santa Rosa, but grew up in a small town in Mendocino County. She is married to Danny Jones and has three daughters.

O’Ferrall-Jones lost her dad to a heart-attack in 2008. Though she had long had an interest in a career in fitness, his death solidified her desire.

“I don’t want that to happen to other people,” she said. “It left such a huge hole in the family.”

But fitness didn’t become her vocation until she was in her late 30s.

She started her career in commercial real estate back in Santa Rosa. But as she approached her 40s in 2010, she decided to shift directions and do something she was really passionate about, she said.

She started with her own personal training business and group training business. In 2016 after Orangetheory opened clubs in Northern California, she got a job as a head coach at one in Santa Rosa.

“Once I started coaching there, I was like, wow, this is something that could reach a lot of people,” she said.

She found out that there was an opportunity to start a franchise in Napa, and she jumped at the chance. O’Ferrall-Jones met Craig Nordby, a Santa Rosa businessman, at the Orangetheory in Santa Rosa, where he was a member.

He loved the premise of the business and wanted to help expand the idea in Napa by joining with O’Ferrall-Jones as a partner. Though he and his wife don’t work at the gym, he helps support the business and offers business advice, she said.

Since opening in July, Orangetheory in Napa has gathered more than 600 members.

“Napa has been so receptive and so ready and excited to have an Orangetheory,” she said.

It offers eight to 11 classes a day and orchestrates challenges throughout the year for members with goals such as losing body fat, rowing a certain distance on the rower or attending a certain number of classes.

The idea is to keep people engaged, encourage community and build pride it what the members have accomplished.

O’Ferrall-Jones’ own aspiration is to provide a platform for people to change their lifestyle and become healthier, she said.

“My goal is to get as many people to the finish line as possible and have people think about fitness as part of their daily life,” O’Ferrall-Jones said, “and have more life because of what they do in this room.”

She loves how Orangetheory provides a place for people who felt they didn’t fit in anywhere before and gives them a community.

“The community is the most important thing we can provide and the opportunity for people to improve their health no matter where they’re starting or what their goal is,” she said.

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You can reach Jennifer Huffman at 256-2218 or jhuffman@napanews.com

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