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Harry Nagata, profiled in the Star last October, lived a remarkable life. While his Japanese-American family was confined to an internment camp during World War II, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and drew upon his knowledge of the Japanese language to serve as an interpreter and interrogator. Mr. Nagata died on Saturday, March 2, at his home in Vineyard Valley Mobile Home Park at the age of 97. His daughter, Vivian Robison, says he died peacefully, sitting on his recliner, watching TV. Farewell to a true patriot.

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Interim Police Chief Tim Foley has done a great job introducing himself and his department to the community over coffee at the Napa Valley Coffee Roasting Company. “A Cup with a Cop” is returning from 8 to 10 a.m. Monday, March 18. This month’s topic is traffic, but if you have other questions or just want to chat, feel free to stop by. Officers will be joined by a special guest, Public Works Director Erica Ahmann Smithies. Erica is friendly and approachable – the same goes for our police officers.

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If you read last week’s paper, I’m sure you noticed the adorable photos of cats up for adoption at We Care Animal Rescue. Unfortunately, the recent storms forced We Care to close to the public for a few weeks during facility repairs. Don’t worry – the animals are just fine, and they’d still love to go home with you. Email shelter@wecareanimalrescue.org with adoption inquiries.

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I had the pleasure of seeing St. Helena Drama’s production of “Mamma Mia” on Sunday and it was a pure delight – although “Dancing Queen” has been stuck on a permanent loop inside my head ever since. But you know what they say about the best way to get a song out of your head – play it again! There are just three more shows at 7 p.m. Friday, March 15; 7 p.m. Saturday, March 16; and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 17. Find tickets at sthelenadrama.com. Be sure to give director Patti Coyle, music director Craig Bond, and the entire cast and crew a hearty cheer for their talent and months of hard work.

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Are you or someone you know a veteran of the Korean War? Rep. Mike Thompson is trying to round up local Korean War vets to receive an Ambassador for Peace Medal from the South Korean government. Veterans and their families should email Thompson’s office at CA05.KoreanWarVeterans@mail.house.gov by May 31. The medal can be awarded posthumously.

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Lots of local businesses struggle to find qualified staff. If your business is one of them, why not reserve a slot at the job fair scheduled for April 24 at the Napa Valley College Upper Valley Campus in St. Helena? The event (1-4 p.m.) is free, but employer slots could fill up quickly. To reserve a spot, email sherry.tennyson@napavalley.edu or call 256-7327.

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If you’ve been to the Cameo Cinema lately, you hardly need to be reminded about RV to Paradise. But if you haven’t, the local grassroots group is trying to provide housing for people who lost their homes to the fire in Butte County. You can make a tax-deductible donation at fwunv.org or mail a check to FWUNV RV2P, P.O. Box 383, St. Helena, CA 94574. Put “RV to Paradise” in the memo line. If you have questions, email Anne Carr at acarriver@gmail.com.

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Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher, better known as MFK Fisher, was a renowned food writer and one of the founders of the Napa Valley Wine Library. Her life and times will be the subject of a fun and informative afternoon with moderator Bonnie Thoreen and panelists Toni Allegra, Jennifer Garden and Cindy Pawlcyn at 3 p.m. Wednesday, March 20, at Rianda House. RSVP to 963-8555, ext. 101.

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Huzzahs to Leidy Tovar Almanza of St. Helena for earning a spot on the Deans’ Commendation List at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. Keep up the good work, Leidy.

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Sad news about an Upvalley grapegrower who also happens to be one of the most feared pitchers ever to take the mound. Tom Seaver’s family announced Thursday that the 74-year-old Hall of Famer has been diagnosed with dementia and has retired from public life, although he will keep working in his Diamond Mountain vineyard. The family say they would appreciate privacy. “If you can play baseball for 20 years you’ve had a pretty good run,” Seaver told the Star in 2010. “But when I was about 28 or 29 and in the middle of my career I had a brother-in-law ask me what I was going to do after I was done. I said I was going back to California and raise grapes. I just never forgot I said that. I found it fascinating. How does the grape grow and end up in the bottle? It’s a discipline a lot like pitching. There are certain things you’ve got to do.” Here’s to a once-in-a-generation player Hank Aaron called “the toughest pitcher I’ve ever faced.”

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