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Second PG&E power shutdown this week could affect 3,750 Napa County customers Thursday as more windy, fire-prone weather lurks

Second PG&E power shutdown this week could affect 3,750 Napa County customers Thursday as more windy, fire-prone weather lurks

From the October 12 recap: Napa Valley news you may have missed today series
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Pacific Gas & Electric Co. announced Tuesday that it is sending advance notifications to about 29,000 customers in parts of 19 counties in Northern and Central California – including 3,750 in Napa County – who may have their power proactively shut off starting Thursday morning to reduce the risk of wildfires sparking from the utility's power lines amid dry and windy conditions.

The public safety power shutoff would be the company’s second in California this week. PG&E had previously shut off power on Monday to about 24,000 customers in parts of 23 counties, including Napa, under similar conditions, and was still working to restore power to all of those customers by Tuesday night.

In the Bay Area, Thursday's PSPS could take effect for 3,750 customers in Napa County, 1,591 for Solano County, 1,481 for Sonoma County and 293 customers in Contra Costa County. The customers potentially affected are being notified two days in advance via text messages, emails and automated phone calls, according to PG&E.

Planned shutdowns are among the utility's efforts to limit wildfires, and are carried out based on a combination of factors, including low humidity, high winds, dry vegetation and real-time observations from PG&E crews around its service area.

More information about the planned power shutoffs can be found online at pge.com/pspsupdates

PG&E to Move, 10,000 Miles of Power Lines, Underground in Wildfire-Prone Areas. PG&E's intent is to prevent its electrical grid from sparking additional wildfires. PG&E's intent is to prevent its electrical grid from sparking additional wildfires. The utility company is currently under investigation for igniting the Dixie Fire, which has so far burned through 86,000 acres in California. . The project, announced on July 22, will focus on distribution lines in wildfire-prone locations of PG&E’s service area. The estimated cost to complete the entire undergrounding process is between $15 billion and $30 billion. PG&E previously resisted plans to bury power lines because of an estimated cost of $3 million per mile. . But newly-hired PG&E CEO Patricia Poppe has decided to focus on the value of human lives. It's too expensive not to do it. Lives are on the line, Patricia Poppe, via statement. The current process used to bury power lines is slow, with PG&E saying the most its completed in a single day is 1,250 feet. . PG&E chief operating officer Adam Wright says they expect to eventually be able to bury more than 1,000 miles of power lines a year.

Napa's Burning Problem: A Napa Valley Register series taking an in-depth look at Napa County's vulnerability to wildfires

The Napa Valley Register takes an in-depth look at Napa County's vulnerability to wildfires in this four-part series.

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