Skip to main content
Updating results

Calcium

  • Updated

The Dietary Guidelines recommend filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables, and all veggies are important in plant-based diets. A cup of raw broccoli has about 3 grams of protein, 30 calories and 10% of your daily fiber (2.5 grams). It also has potassium, vitamin K, vitamin C and calcium. “I love to roast up broccoli in the oven with a little bit of olive oil and salt, and you can also add raw or steamed broccoli to salads,” says Rizzo.

  • Updated

It’s no surprise that most people think of tofu when they think of plant-based eating: 3 ounces has a whopping 9 grams of protein. Soy is a complete protein, meaning that it contains all of the essential amino acids that are not commonly found in many plant proteins. But tofu is also a good source of calcium, which is great for anyone avoiding dairy. Tofu can be added to practically any dish, from stir-fries to salads to smoothies.

  • Updated

There are many varieties of lettuce, but the most common in grocery stores are romaine, iceberg, butter lettuce and green leaf. The nutritional values vary, but most types of lettuce are high in fiber, vitamins A and C, calcium, potassium, folate and iron and are low in calories.

  • Updated

There are six common varieties of kale. All varieties are high in fiber, protein, vitamins A, K and C, calcium and manganese. Buy kale in unwashed, uncut bunches, and refrigerate for up to a week. You should typically remove the stems before cooking, though some varieties don’t require it. Kale can be sauteed, steamed or pan-seared for a tender bite.

  • Updated

One cup of raw kale provides 80 mg of vitamin C and packs hefty doses of vitamin A, vitamin B and calcium. We love thinking outside the box when it comes to serving this healthy green veggie (like turning leaves into delicious, crispy chips!)

  • Updated

There are so many kinds of yogurt in the dairy aisle these days, it can be tough to know which to choose! That's a great problem to have; many of the yogurts that have hit store shelves in the past decade offer nutritional benefits including higher protein levels, more calcium and additional choices for...

  • Updated

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My doctor says that exercise is even better than calcium supplements for helping maintain bone density and prevent fractures. ANSWER: Both calcium and physical activity are important for bone health. But when you consider the net benefits of calcium, especially in supplement form,...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News