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California Storms

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California’s weather has calmed down after weeks of atmospheric rivers that slammed the state with damaging rains, wind and surf. Tallying the damage will take time, but a California Office of Emergency Services spokesperson says the number of homes and other structures that will be red-tagged as uninhabitable could be in the “low thousands.” The damage is spread across 41 of California’s 58 counties. Light rain and snow showers are lingering in some areas Tuesday, but the skies are largely clear. The National Weather Service says there will be a shot of precipitation from a quick system on Wednesday into Thursday, followed by a dry period.

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California’s weather has calmed down after weeks of atmospheric rivers that slammed the state with damaging rains, wind and surf. Tallying the damage will take time, but a California Office of Emergency Services spokesperson says the number of homes and other structures that will be red-tagged as uninhabitable could be in the “low thousands.” The damage is spread across 41 of California’s 58 counties. Light rain and snow showers are lingering in some areas Tuesday, but the skies are largely clear. The National Weather Service says there will be a shot of precipitation from a quick system on Wednesday into Thursday, followed by a dry period.

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The ninth in a three-week series of major winter storms is churning through California. Mountain driving remains dangerous and flooding risk is high near swollen rivers, even as the sun has come out in some areas. Heavy snow continues to fall across the Sierra. The National Weather Service is discouraging travel. A barrage of atmospheric river storms has dumped rain and snow on California since late December, cutting power to thousands, swamping roads, unleashing debris flows, and triggering landslides. President Joe Biden will travel to California’s central coast on Thursday to visit areas that have been impacted by the extreme weather.

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The ninth in a three-week series of major winter storms is churning through California. Mountain driving remains dangerous and flooding risk is high near swollen rivers, even as the sun has come out in some areas. Heavy snow continues to fall across the Sierra. The National Weather Service is discouraging travel. A barrage of atmospheric river storms has dumped rain and snow on California since late December, cutting power to thousands, swamping roads, unleashing debris flows, and triggering landslides. President Joe Biden will travel to California’s central coast on Thursday to visit areas that have been impacted by the extreme weather.

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More rain and snow fell during the weekend in storm-battered California, making travel dangerous and prompting flooding concerns along a swollen river near Sacramento. Bands of gusty thunderstorms started Saturday in the north and spread south, with yet another atmospheric river storm following close behind Sunday. Up to two inches of rain were predicted for the saturated Sacramento Valley, where residents of semi-rural Wilton were ordered to evacuate as the Cosumnes River continued to rise. More snow was expected in the Sierra Nevada. Dry days are in this week’s forecast for California starting Tuesday.

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Storm-battered California is getting more wind, rain and snow, raising flooding concerns, causing power outages and making travel dangerous. Bands of rain with gusty winds started Saturday in the north and spread south, with more storms expected to follow into early next week. Flood warnings have been issued for parts of counties north and south of San Francisco Bay. The tiny Santa Cruz County community of Felton Grove along the San Lorenzo River has been ordered evacuated. In Sacramento County, an evacuation order has been issued for residents of a semi-rural area along the Cosumnes River. A backcountry avalanche warning has been posted for the central Sierra Nevada, including the greater Lake Tahoe area.

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Gov. Gavin Newsom and other officials are pleading with Californians to stay alert through several more rounds of stormy weather over the weekend and into next week. FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell visited California on Friday to tour damage. In Montecito, Newsom toured damage and thanked members of the California National Guard for clearing debris. Flood warnings are in effect for the Salinas River in Monterey County where thousands of acres of farmland could be inundated. California has been drenched by atmospheric river storms since late December, putting a dent in the state’s long drought but also causing flooding, power outages and at least 19 deaths.

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Atmospheric rivers pounding California since late last year have coated mountains with a full winter’s worth of snow and begun raising reservoir levels but experts say it will take much more to precipitation to reverse the effects of years of drought. The U.S. Drought Monitor’s weekly update Thursday shows that "extreme” drought has been virtually eliminated. Two weeks ago extreme drought covered 35% of California. The Drought Monitor characterizes the improvement as a significant reduction in drought intensity but cautions that large parts of the state still have moisture deficits. Most of the state is now in the “severe” or “moderate” categories of drought.

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Storm-ravaged California is scrambling to clean up and repair widespread damage. A new storm gaining strength Wednesday is expected to be limited to the north while the south gets a break. That will be followed by two more storms this weekend and next week. Crews are working to reopen roads closed by rockslides, swamped by flooding or smothered with mud.  More than half of California’s 58 counties were declared disaster areas. At least 18 people have died in storms since late December.

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Storm-ravaged California is scrambling to clean up and repair widespread damage. A new storm gaining strength Wednesday is expected to be limited to the north while the south gets a break. That will be followed by two more storms this weekend and next week. Crews are working to reopen roads closed by rockslides, swamped by flooding or smothered with mud.  More than half of California’s 58 counties were declared disaster areas. At least 18 people have died in storms since late December.

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Sinkholes swallowed cars and floodwaters swamped towns and swept away a small boy as California deals with more wild winter weather. Millions of people were under flood warnings, and more than 110,000 homes and businesses were without power because of heavy rains, hail and landslides. Thousands have been ordered to evacuate their homes. State officials say at least 17 people have died from storms that began late last month. Meanwhile, the next system in a powerful string of storms loomed on the horizon Tuesday.

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Sinkholes swallowed cars and raging torrents swamped towns and swept away a small boy as California was wracked by more wild winter. Meanwhile, the next system in a powerful string of storms loomed on the horizon. Millions of people were still under flood warnings, and more than 200,000 homes and businesses were without power because of heavy rains, hail and landslides. Thousands have been ordered to evacuate their homes. State officials say at least 17 people have died from storms that began late last month.

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Rescuers have ended the search for a 5-year-old boy who was swept away by floodwaters in central California Monday morning. Meanwhile, the entire coastal community of Montecito was ordered evacuated as California residents grappled with flooding and mudslides in the latest in a series of powerful storms. Tens of thousands of people remained without power, and some schools closed for the day. The evacuation order came on the fifth anniversary of a mudslide that killed 23 people and destroyed more than 100 homes in Montecito. Streets and highways transformed into gushing rivers, trees toppled, mud slid and motorists growled as they hit roadblocks caused by fallen debris.

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Rain-weary Californians grappled with flooding and mudslides as the latest in a series of powerful storms walloped the state, prompting widespread evacuations, toppling trees and frustrating motorists who hit roadblocks caused by fallen debris. Tens of thousands of people remained without power, and some schools closed for the day. An evacuation order for the entire community of Montecito and surrounding canyons scarred by recent wildfires came on the fifth anniversary of a mudslide that killed 23 people and destroyed more than 100 homes in the coastal enclave. Up the coast, evacuation orders were issued in coastal, woodsy Santa Cruz County for about 32,000 residents.

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Northern California residents are bracing for another round of powerful storms. A weather phenomenon known as an atmospheric river dumped up to 5 inches of rain in the Sacramento region on Saturday. More rain was expected to move into the area Monday night. But bigger storms were forecasted to hit Wednesday and again over the weekend. Saturday's storms killed one person and washed away a section of a levee that protects mostly farmland in south Sacramento County. Forecasters say the coming storms could again cause widespread flooding and power outages. Crews were rushing to repair the levee before the next storm hits.

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Evacuation warnings were in place in rural Northern California on New Year’s Day after a powerful storm brought drenching rain or heavy snowfall to much of the state, breaching levees, snarling traffic and closing major highways. Major flooding occurred in agricultural areas south of Sacramento, where rivers swelled and floods inundated dozens of cars along State Route 99. Residents of one low-lying community were ordered to leave, and others were told to prepare to leave before roadways are cut off by rising water. More than 4 feet of snow fell in the Sierra. It was the first of several storms expected to roll across California over the span of a week.

Evacuation warnings were in place in rural Northern California on New Year’s Day after a powerful storm brought drenching rain or heavy snowfall to much of the state, breaching levees, snarling traffic and closing major highways. Major flooding occurred in agricultural areas south of Sacramento, where rivers swelled and floods inundated dozens of cars along State Route 99. Residents of one low-lying community were ordered to leave, and others were told to prepare to leave before roadways are cut off by rising water. More than 4 feet of snow fell in the Sierra. It was the first of several storms expected to roll across California over the span of a week.

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A powerful storm is bringing drenching rain or heavy snowfall to much of California as the state gets ready to usher in a new year. Flooding and rock slides have closed portions of roads in northern California. In the high Sierra Nevada, as much as 2 feet of snow could accumulate into early Sunday. Chains or four-wheel drive are being required for vehicles on many roads through the mountains. The National Weather Service in Sacramento says the atmospheric river storm is pulling in a long and wide plume of moisture from the Pacific Ocean. One ski resort south of Lake Tahoe closed a chair lift because of flooding.

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