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Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is not the guy most politicians would summon to hold a news conference for them, not after his false assertions of election fraud. But one place where Giuliani is in high demand these days is on his son Andrew's long shot campaign to win the GOP nomination for governor of New York. Andrew Giuliani worked as an aide in the Trump White House and as a commentator on the conservative network Newsmax, but he has never held elected office. His father says that when he was mayor and his son a teenager, his son was helpful to him.

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Seven states are set to host primary elections Tuesday as the nation comes to terms with last week’s stunning Supreme Court ruling eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion. The slate of nominating contests could offer the first clues as to whether the political landscape has shifted. Abortion is a particularly relevant issue in Colorado, where GOP voters are deciding whether to nominate a rare pro-choice Republican in the state’s high-profile U.S. Senate contest. The primaries will also offer new insight about the state of the Republican Party. The central issue in virtually every GOP contest remains fealty to former President Donald Trump and his baseless conspiracy theories.

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Congressional primary runoffs are rare in Mississippi. But this year, two of the state’s Republican incumbents are fighting to keep their jobs in runoffs against challengers from their own party. Two-term Rep. Michael Guest faces former Navy pilot Michael Cassidy in a runoff Tuesday in central Mississippi's 3rd District, while six-term Rep. Steven Palazzo faces sheriff Mike Ezell in the southern 4th District. Palazzo's runoff comes after he was accused in a congressional ethics report of abusing his office by misspending campaign funds. Guest was forced into a runoff amid criticism of his vote to create an independent commission to investigate the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

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Mitt Romney isn’t up for reelection this year, but his name is surfacing in Republican primaries throughout the nation. Candidates are using the label “Mitt Romney Republican” to frame opponents as insufficiently conservative and enemies of the Trump-era GOP. Candidates have employed the concept in attack ads and talking points in Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania. In Romney's home state Utah, Republican challengers taking on incumbent congressmen are using the attack, even though Romney won overwhelmingly only four years ago. The fact that Romney remains potent attack fodder reflects his singular position in politics and ongoing divisions within the Republican Party.

The House Jan. 6 committee began its work under deep political skepticism. A lingering question was what more could be said about the Capitol riot. The answer, it turns out, is quite a lot. The committee's public hearings are showing just how close the United States came to a constitutional crisis when President Donald Trump refused to admit his election defeat. He tried to stop Democrat Joe Biden from being the winner and then summoned a mob to the Capitol. The hearings carry echoes of Watergate and are showcasing the civic decency of officials who did their jobs despite grave risks.

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Former top Justice Department officials have testified to the Jan. 6 committee that President Donald Trump hounded the department to pursue his false election fraud claims. They say he contacted the agency’s leader “virtually every day” and strove in vain to enlist the government’s top law enforcement officials in his desperate bid to stay in power. The House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol also revealed Thursday that several Republican loyalists in Congress who trumpeted the president’s claims later sought pardons from the White House after the effort failed.

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A U.S. Senate candidate in Colorado, Joe O'Dea, is a rarity in the Republican Party as a supporter of abortion rights. O'Dea is running for his party's nomination to challenge Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet in a state that's grown increasingly liberal. On other issues, O’Dea sounds like a typical conservative. He wants to cut back government regulation and expand oil and gas production. But his support for abortion rights in most cases stands out in a party for which opposition to abortion has become a bedrock principle. O'Dea's chief rival in Tuesday's primary is state Rep. Ron Hanks, who opposes abortion in all circumstances.

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The lawyer for the ex-wife of Missouri U.S. Senate candidate Eric Greitens says the family has been subjected to “serious threats” in the days since Greitens released a violent campaign video in which he declares he’s hunting RINOs, or Republicans in Name Only. During a Thursday hearing in the couple's child custody case in Columbia, Missouri, attorney Helen Wade said the video “has created a situation where others may perceive it as a call to arms.” Greitens was not at the hearing but his attorney called it “disingenuous” to suggest that Greitens “would want harm to befall" his ex-wife.

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State Sen. Sonia Chang-Díaz is ending her campaign for governor of Massachusetts. That leaves state Attorney General Maura Healey as the only viable Democrat still in the running. Chang-Díaz made the announcement Thursday. That's one year after she declared she was entering the race. She says she will turn her focus to make sure that “down-ballot candidates who share her values and approach to put courage over politics” get elected. Chang-Díaz’s name will remain on the Sept. 6 primary ballot. The two Republicans still in the race are former state Rep. Geoff Diehl and Wrentham business owner Chris Doughty.

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A Republican U.S. representative says he believes abortion rights activists may be behind vandalism at the building his campaign office shares with an anti-abortion group in southern Michigan. U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg’s campaign says attackers smashed windows and a front door of the building in Jackson, Michigan, early Wednesday. Fire officials say a nearby sign was also spray-painted pink, but there's no evidence anyone entered the building. Walberg, of Tipton, says the graffiti indicates the vandalism was done by someone who supports abortion rights. Walberg says he opposes abortion. Jackson Right to Life shares the building with his campaign office.

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An associate of Rudy Giuliani who was convicted of campaign finance crimes at trial and later pleaded guilty to a separate fraud charge is asking to be spared from prison at his sentencing next week. Lawyers for Lev Parnas made the request to a Manhattan federal court judge in papers that were filed publicly Wednesday. Prosecutors filed their own sentencing submission, asking a judge to order a prison sentence of at least 6 1/2 years. They said Parnas had for years lied and swindled for his own benefit. Parnas was convicted last year at a Manhattan trial.

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The campaign manager for Republican Tara Sweeney says the campaign does not plan to sue over a finding released by Alaska elections officials that Sweeney cannot advance to the special U.S. House election following the withdrawal of another candidate. The director of the Division of Elections cited the timing of independent Al Gross’ withdrawal in saying state law doesn't permit the fifth-place candidate to advance. Gross placed third in the special primary and was positioned to advance to the special election as one of the top four vote-getters. But on Monday, he suddenly announced plans to end his campaign. Sweeney finished fifth. She says she believes she should be moved to the fourth spot.

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Wes Allen has won the Republican nomination to become Alabama's top election official, secretary of state. The state lawmaker from Troy defeated outgoing State Auditor Jim Zeigler in Tuesday's runoff. Allen will face Democrat Pamela J. Laffitte in November. And Yolanda Rochelle Flowers defeated state Sen. Malika Sanders Fortier in the Democratic runoff for governor. She becomes the first Black person to win a major party’s gubernatorial nomination in Alabama. Three other statewide races also were decided. In north Alabama's 5th congressional district, Madison County Commission chair Dale Strong defeated Casey Wardynski, a former Huntsville school superintendent.

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An Alaska elections official says the fifth-place finisher in the special primary for the state’s U.S. House seat will not advance to an August special election following the withdrawal of independent Al Gross, who was in third place. Gail Fenumiai, the director of the Division of Elections, says that’s because the withdrawal happened less than 64 days before the special election. She pointed to a provision of law laying out the timeline. She says Gross’ name would be removed from the special election ballot. She says any party that disagrees with the decisions should sue immediately, citing the timeline for printing ballots. The remaining candidates for that election are former Gov. Sarah Palin and Nick Begich, both Republicans, and Democrat Mary Peltola.

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The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol insurrection is turning to former President Donald Trump’s pressure campaign on state and local officials to overturn his 2020 election loss. In its fourth hearing this month, the panel is examining how Trump focused on a few swing states, directly urging officials to decertify President Joe Biden’s victory or find additional votes for himself. That campaign was part of a larger scheme that also involved dozens of lawsuits, pressure on Department of Justice officials and, eventually, lobbying Vice President Mike Pence to reject Biden’s win at the congressional electoral count on Jan. 6.

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Nevada's U.S. Senate race between Democratic incumbent Catherine Cortez Masto and Republican challenger Adam Laxalt is shaping up as one of the country's most competitive. The outcome in November could sway the balance of power in the Senate. Experts say the race will hinge on the candidates’ respective ties to President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump. Laxalt led failed court challenges to overturn Nevada's 2020 election results based on false fraud claims. Cortez Masto has often distanced herself from her party, and it's not yet known if she'll seek Biden’s help. Democratic voters slightly outnumber Republicans in Nevada, but the state's more than half a million nonpartisan voters could swing the outcome either way.

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Independent Al Gross says he is ending his bid for Alaska’s only U.S. House seat. He says there are two “outstanding” Alaska Native women in the race who would serve Alaska well. His campaign says he is referring to Democrat Mary Peltola and Republican Tara Sweeney. Peltola was in fourth place in the June 11 special primary and Sweeney was in fifth. The top four vote-getters in the special primary advance to an August special election. Gross was in third, behind Republicans Sarah Palin and Nick Begich. The deadline to withdraw as a candidate for the special election is Sunday. Peltola and Sweeney also have filed to run in the August regular primary.

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Mayor Muriel Bowser cruised to reelection in the nation’s capital four years ago without serious opposition. And as the city enjoyed prosperous times, the main criticism of her policies was that Washington was growing too quickly, driving up housing costs and pricing out Black residents in a gentrification wave. One tumultuous term later, and with homicide and violent crime rates spiraling, Bowser finds herself in a reelection fight. She's trying to fend off two challengers from the District of Columbia Council who accuse her of mishandling public safety issues and criticize her push to hire more police officers. The campaign reflects a wider dynamic playing out in longtime Democratic strongholds, with progressives facing off against party traditionalists over crime.

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Facebook has removed a campaign video by Republican Missouri U.S. Senate candidate Eric Greitens that shows him brandishing a shotgun and declaring that he's hunting RINOs, or Republicans In Name Only. In the video, Greitens urges viewers to "get a RINO hunting permit. There’s no bagging limit, no tagging limit and it doesn’t expire until we save our country.” Facebook says the ad violates “policies prohibiting violence and incitement.” Twitter blocked the video from being shared. The video comes at a time of renewed focus on violence in politics. Greitens resigned in disgrace as Missouri governor in 2018, and his ex-wife has alleged he physically abused her and their child.

The fate of the Democratic Party is intertwined in a pair of Pennsylvania elections that’ll be closely watched this year. John Fetterman could help the party keep control of the U.S. Senate. Josh Shapiro faces a Republican rival for governor who has embraced conspiracies about the last presidential election. With the stakes so high, Fetterman and Shapiro are participating in a coordinated campaign funded and run by party organizations. But they’re already facing big challenges. Fetterman suffered a stroke last month and hasn’t returned to the campaign trail. And both candidates will be running in a difficult environment for Democrats, weighed down by inflation and President Joe Biden’s unpopularity.

The race for Alaska’s U.S. House seat is taking shape. Republican Sarah Palin is seeking a return to elected office 13 years after she resigned as governor. Two of her rivals, Republican Nick Begich and independent Al Gross, are trying to paint her run as unserious and self-serving. The fourth candidate running, Democrat Mary Peltola, says negative campaigning is one of the most unsavory parts of U.S. politics. Palin, Begich, Gross and Peltola, in that order, were the top vote-getters in last week’s special primary. They will compete in a special election set for Aug. 16 that will feature ranked choice voting.

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New Yorkers began going to the polls Saturday to cast early votes in a primary election that could determine whether Gov. Kathy Hochul keeps her job. Select polling places will be open for early votes across the state through June 26, ahead of the June 28 primary. In the Democratic gubernatorial primary, Hochul is trying to fend off challenges from U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi and New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. On the Republican side, four candidates are competing for the nomination: U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin, former Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, businessman Harry Wilson and Andrew Giuliani, the son of New York City’s former mayor.

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