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Authorities say two people have been rescued more than six hours after their single-engine plane crashed and got stuck in some live power lines in Maryland. The crash caused widespread outages in Montgomery County. Fire Chief Scott Goldstein says responders were able to safely remove both people after disconnecting the lines and securing the plane to the tower early Monday. He says both suffered “serious injuries” from the crash and that hypothermia had set in while they waited to be rescued. The Federal Aviation Administration says the crash happened around 5:40 p.m. Sunday near Montgomery County Airpark in Gaithersburg.

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Ukraine is preparing for more Russian strikes and has warned of the possibility of a new round of evacuations from the capital. Russia has been attacking energy facilities and other key infrastructure in recent weeks, and authorities are struggling to make repairs as quickly as the damage is inflicted. In the West meanwhile, preparations are being stepped up to boost humanitarian aid to Ukraine so that the population can enjoy some warmth during their coldest months of need and keep the resolve of the nation as high as possible. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy warned that Russian troops “are preparing new strikes and as long as they have missiles, they won’t stop.”

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Russian energy giant Gazprom announced Monday that it will not further reduce natural gas to Moldova as it had threatened to do after claiming that bills went unpaid and that flows crossing through Ukraine were not making it to Moldova. Gazprom tweeted Monday that Moldovagaz has “eliminated the violation of payment” for November supplies and that “funds for the gas deposited on the territory of Ukraine, intended for consumers in Moldova, have been received.” Last week, Moldova and Ukraine hit back at Gazprom’s claim that Russian gas moving through the last pipeline to Western Europe was being stored in Ukraine. They said all supplies Russia sends through the war-torn country get “fully transferred” to Moldova.

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Wall Street is heading lower amid widespread protests in China calling for Xi Jinping to step down and an end to one-party rule. Futures for the Dow Jones industrials fell 0.5% Monday and the S&P slipped 0.7%. Crude prices neared a low point for the year partially due to unrest in China, and have fallen for three consecutive weeks. Crude prices are now negative for 2022 and, after soaring above $120 in June, a barrel of benchmark U.S. crude can now be had for less than $74 per barrel.

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NATO is returning to the scene of one of its most controversial decisions to repeat a vow that Ukraine will join the military alliance one day. On Tuesday, NATO foreign ministers will gather for two days at the Palace of the Parliament in the Romanian capital, Bucharest. There, in April 2008, U.S. President George W. Bush persuaded his allies to open NATO’s door to Ukraine and Georgia. The move deeply angered Russia. This time, NATO will make fresh pledges of non-lethal support to Ukraine to help its troops get through the winter. Individual allies will probably donate more military equipment to fend off Russian forces. The ministers will also look to Ukraine's long-term future.

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Connecticut lawmakers are set to discuss gasoline taxes, heating-bill help, pandemic pay for essential workers and other issues when they convene for a special legislative session on Monday. Gov. Ned Lamont has said he's calling the General Assembly into special session to help Connecticut residents cope with rising prices. Connecticut’s 25-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax is currently suspended through Nov. 30. The Democratic governor wants to keep the tax on hold until the end of the year, then start adding back five cents per month until hitting the prior 25-cent-per-gallon amount in May.

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The Biden administration is easing some oil sanctions on Venezuela in an effort to support newly restarted negotiations between the Venezuelan government and its opposition. The Treasury Department is allowing Chevron to resume “limited” energy production in Venezuela after years of sanctions that have dramatically curtailed oil and gas profits that have flowed to President Nicolás Maduro’s government. Earlier this year the Treasury Department again allowed the California-based Chevron and other U.S. companies to perform basic upkeep of wells it operates jointly with state-run oil giant PDVSA. Under the new policy, profits from the sale of energy would be directed to paying down debt owed to Chevron, rather than providing profits to PDVSA.

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World Cup host Qatar sits in a region that is warming faster than anywhere else on earth besides the Arctic. The wealthy Gulf Arab nation has been able to pay for extreme adaptive measures so far like outdoor air-conditioning to mitigate the effects of rising temperatures in some areas. Qatar has inched forward in recent years with climate pledges. But the transition away from hydrocarbons will not be simple for one of the world's largest producers and exporters of natural gas.

Germany and France have pledged to provide each other mutual support in preventing a possible energy crisis after supplies from Russia dried up amid the war in Ukraine. As part of a joint agreement signed by the countries' leaders Friday, Germany will provide France with electricity while getting much-needed natural gas in return. Before Russia invaded Ukraine nine months ago, Germany was heavily reliant on Russian gas supplies. Since then, Germany has scrambled to find other sources. France is struggling to meet its electricity needs due to repairs at nuclear power plants. There are concerns that a sharp rise in electricity demand from France this winter, coupled with lower production in Germany, could strain the continent’s grid.

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Stocks wobbled to a mixed close on Wall Street, but every major index notched weekly gains in a holiday-shortened week. The S&P 500 edged lower Friday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose and the Nasdaq fell. Technology stocks were the biggest drags on the broader market. Markets were closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday and closed at 1 p.m. Eastern Friday. Long-term bond yields were relatively stable and crude oil prices fell. Global shares were mixed amid worries about China’s lockdowns and restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus infections.

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Asian shares are mixed as worries about the regional economy deepen and government data showed higher-than-expected inflation in Japan. Benchmarks fell in Tokyo, Seoul and Hong Kong, while gaining in Sydney and Shanghai. Oil prices rose. Investors have their eyes on China’s lockdowns and restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus infections, as the direction China takes will have a great impact on the rest of Asia. Data on inflation in Tokyo for November beat analysts’ expectations, with the core consumer price index up 3.6%, the worst in more than four decades. U.S. markets were closed for Thanksgiving and will have a shortened session on Friday. European stocks finished higher on Thursday.

The deadline is looming for Western allies to agree on a price cap on Russia oil. The cap proposed by U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen aims to reduce Russia's oil earnings that support its military and the invasion of Ukraine. But there are questions about how effective the cap will be. The Dec. 5 start date also coincides with the European Union's embargo on most Russian oil shipments. There's uncertainty about how all this will affect oil markets, which are swinging between fears of lost Russian supply and weakening demand from the lagging global economy. The biggest disruption may not come until Feb. 5, when Europe halts imports of Russian oil products including diesel fuel.

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European Union nations have again failed to bridge bitter disagreements over a natural gas price cap as they struggle to effectively shield 450 million citizens from massive increases in their utility bills as cold weather sets in. An emergency meeting of energy ministers Thursday only showed how the energy crisis tied to Russia’s war in Ukraine has divided the 27-nation bloc in almost irreconcilable blocs. Ministers couldn't agree on when and how a price cap on gas purchases should kick in. Nations including Greece, Spain, Belgium and France are demanding cheaper gas to ease household bills. Germany, the Netherlands and others insist supplies are at risk if a cap stops EU countries from buying gas above a certain price.

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The leaders of four Central European countries are holding a summit in Slovakia to discuss energy, migration and regional cooperation. But Thursday's meeting in Kosice, Slovakia, could redefine the nature of cooperation of the Visegrad Four regional alliance that has been strained by a divergence of approaches to the war in Ukraine. Fault lines have appeared in the regional bloc, which is made up of Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The reason is Hungary's lukewarm support for Ukraine. The meeting will be the first in months since previous summits were cancelled after being boycotted by Czech and Polish officials. Leaders are expected to pressure Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban to ratify the NATO accession of Finland and Sweden.

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Asian shares are higher, although optimism about the Federal Reserve holding back on aggressive interest rate hikes was countered by some uncertainty about coronavirus restrictions in China. Trading was also relatively muted in Asia ahead of Thanksgiving holidays in the U.S. U.S. futures were higher while oil prices edged lower. Benchmarks rose in early trading in Japan, Australia and South Korea. Oil prices fell. Stocks closed higher on Wall Street following the release of the minutes from the Fed's most recent policy meeting, which showed officials agreed smaller rate hikes would likely be appropriate “soon.”

A plea hearing has been scheduled for next week in the case of a natural gas driller facing felony charges in Pennsylvania over allegations it polluted a small community's drinking water. Houston-based Coterra Energy Inc. will appear in Susquehanna County Court on Tuesday. That's according to online court records. Coterra’s corporate predecessor, Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., was charged with drilling faulty gas wells that leaked flammable methane into residential water supplies in Dimock and surrounding communities. Dimock drew national notoriety after residents were filmed lighting their tap water on fire in the 2010 documentary “Gasland.”

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Connecticut state legislators are returning to the Capitol to consider extending the soon-to-expire gas tax holiday, increase funding for pandemic payments to essential workers and vote on other initiatives to help residents cope with rising costs. Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont issued the first executive order of his second term on Wednesday and called the General Assembly into special session on Monday. Connecticut’s 25-cent-per-gallon gas tax has been suspended since April 1 and is currently scheduled to resume on Nov. 30. Lamont wants legislators to continue the suspension of the full 25 cents through Dec. 31 before incrementally scaling back the tax relief at five cents per month, beginning Jan. 1.

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The United States is sending an additional $400 million in ammunition and generators to Ukraine. The White House made the announcement Wednesday. The U.S. is pulling the gear from its own stockpiles to get the support to Ukraine as fast as possible as Russia continues to target Ukraine’s energy sources and winter sets in. Including the latest aid, the U.S. has committed more than $19 billion in weapons and other equipment to Ukraine since Russia attacked on Feb. 24. The new package of aid will be provided through presidential drawdown authority, which allows the Pentagon to take weapons from its own stock and quickly ship them to Ukraine.

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The first of several ships that will serve as floating terminals to receive liquefied natural gas imports in Germany have arrived off the Baltic Sea port of Mukran. In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Germany has scrambled to secure alternative sources of gas to replace Russian supplies, on which the country had long relied. The 918-foot-long Neptune is due to begin operation in nearby Lubmin on Dec. 1. Similar “floating storage and regasification units" are scheduled to arrive at two North Sea ports later this year. Chancellor Olaf Scholz told lawmakers Wednesday that along with other measures taken by the government, “this winter Germany’s energy security seems assured.”

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Asian shares have risen after solid earnings pushed retailers higher on Wall Street ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S. Benchmarks rose in Hong Kong, Seoul and Sydney but fell in Shanghai. Markets were closed in Japan for a holiday. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand raised its benchmark rate by three-quarters of a point to 4.25%. On Tuesday, the S&P 500 rose 1.4% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average added 1.2%. The Nasdaq composite added 1.4%. Treasury yields slipped. Best Buy soared more than 12% after the Minneapolis-based consumer electronics chain did better than analysts expected and said a decline in sales for the year will not be as bad as it had projected earlier.

New York is tapping the brakes on the spread of cryptocurrency mining. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a first-in-the-nation law Tuesday. The measure sets a two-year pause moratorium on new and renewed air permits for fossil fuel power plants used for energy-intensive “proof-of-work” cryptocurrency mining. That's a term for the computational process that records and secures transactions in bitcoin and similar forms of digital money. Environmentalists said the state was undermining its climate goals by letting cryptomining operations run their own natural gas-burning power plants. Cryptocurrency advocates argued that the measure would crimp New York’s economic development and singled out crypto while not addressing other fossil fuel use.

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A new water line will deliver something that residents of a rural Pennsylvania community have gone without for the last 14 years — a clean, reliable supply of drinking water. That's according to Pennsylvania American Water. The public utility released details of a plan to mitigate the damage that a gas driller is charged with causing in Dimock. The tiny village in northeastern Pennsylvania became notorious in the early days of the state’s drilling and fracking boom after residents were filmed lighting their tap water on fire. Dimock residents were briefed on the water line plan Monday night.

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Officials say Ukraine could face rolling blackouts through March because Russian airstrikes have caused what they call “colossal” damage to the power grid. To cope in the harsh winter, authorities are urging Ukrainians to stock up on supplies and evacuate hard-hit areas. Russia has been pummeling Ukraine’s power grid and other infrastructure for weeks. That onslaught has caused widespread blackouts and deprived millions of Ukrainians of electricity, heat and water. The head of Ukraine's power grid operator says the attacks have damaged practically every thermal and hydroelectric power plant. In another development, the United States announced $4.5 billion in aid to bolster Ukraine's economic stability and support core government services.

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Hobbled by high interest rates, punishing inflation and Russia’s war against Ukraine, the world economy is expected to eke out only modest growth this year and to expand even more tepidly in 2023. That's the sobering forecast issued Tuesday by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In the OECD’s estimation, the world economy will grow just 3.1% this year, down sharply from a robust 5.9% in 2021. Next year, the OECD predicts, would be even worse: The international economy will expand only 2.2%. In its latest forecast, the organization predicts that the U.S. Federal Reserve’s aggressive drive to tame inflation with higher interest rates will grind the U.S. economy to a near-halt.

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The Treasury Department has released new details of its long-awaited plan to impose a price cap on Russian oil, but the U.S. and its allies are still finalizing how much they’ll pay for petroleum exports that have helped fund the war in Ukraine. The new guidance is meant to help firms and maritime insurers understand how to abide by the price ceiling. That's according to a senior Treasury official who discussed the plans on a call with reporters on condition of anonymity. The official says the plan allows the U.S. and its allies to reduce Russia’s revenues while keeping oil on the market.

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