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The family of a former University of California-San Diego rower who killed himself in January 2021 says he was pushed too far by his coach. Coach Geoff Bond is no longer at the school and the parents of Brian Lilly Jr. filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against him. The defense team for Bond filed a motion to dismiss the case. The defense says Bond hadn’t seen Brian Lilly Jr. for the nine months prior to his death.

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The family of a former University of California-San Diego rower who killed himself in January 2021 says he was pushed too far by his coach. Coach Geoff Bond is no longer at the school and the parents of Brian Lilly Jr. filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against him. The defense team for Bond filed a motion to dismiss the case. The defense says Bond hadn’t seen Brian Lilly Jr. for the nine months prior to his death.

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Electronic cigarette maker Juul Labs has reached settlements covering more than 8,000 cases brought by about 10,000 plaintiffs related to its vaping products. Financial terms of the settlement were not disclosed, but Juul said that it has secured an equity investment to fund it. The company has been buffeted by lawsuits and chances that it would seek bankruptcy protection, or a buyer, were elevated last month as Juul announced hundreds of layoffs and secured new financing to continue operations.

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Electronic cigarette maker Juul Labs has reached settlements covering more than 8,000 cases brought by about 10,000 plaintiffs related to its vaping products. Financial terms of the settlement were not disclosed, but Juul said that it has secured an equity investment to fund it. The company has been buffeted by lawsuits and chances that it would seek bankruptcy protection, or a buyer, were elevated last month as Juul announced hundreds of layoffs and secured new financing to continue operations.

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A state court judge’s ruling has placed Oregon’s tough new voter-approved gun law on hold just hours after a federal court judge in Portland allowed a ban on the sale and transfer of high-capacity magazines to take effect this week. The ruling by Harney County Judge Robert Raschio threw the law’s implementation into limbo. Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum will file an immediate appeal with the Oregon Supreme Court. Earlier Tuesday, a federal judge in Portland delivered an initial victory to proponents of the sweeping gun-control measure by allowing the high-capacity magazine ban to take effect Thursday.

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A federal judge has dismissed a U.S. lawsuit against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the killing of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Tuesday's ruling bows to the Biden administration’s insistence that the prince was legally immune in the case. Washington, D.C., U.S. District Judge John D. Bates heeded the U.S. government’s request shielding Prince Mohammed from the case under the longstanding principle of limited immunity for heads of government. That's despite what Bates called “credible allegations of his involvement in Khashoggi’s murder.” Saudi officials killed Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in 2018. Khashoggi, a columnist for The Washington Post, had written critically of Prince Mohammed.

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More than three dozen women have filed a lawsuit in New York against writer and director James Toback, accusing him of sexual abuse. The lawsuit comes after New York state last month instituted a one-year window for people to file lawsuits over sexual assault claims even if they took place decades ago. Accusations that Toback had engaged in sexual abuse going back years surfaced in late 2017. Information on attorneys or representatives for Toback was not available; he has denied the allegations made against him. Toback was nominated for an Oscar for writing 1991′s “Bugsy,” and has had a career in Hollywood spanning more than 40 years.

Five women who accuse Bill Cosby of sexually assaulting them decades ago have filed a new lawsuit against the 85-year-old comedian _ and this one calls NBCUniversal, a studio and a production company complicit in the abuse. The lawsuit comes more than a year after Cosby left prison after his 2018 sexual assault conviction in Pennsylvania was overturned. Earlier this year, a Los Angeles jury awarded $500,000 to a woman who said Cosby sexually abused her at the Playboy Mansion when she was a teenager in 1975. NBC says it won't comment on legal issues.

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Two North Carolina Democratic government lawyers have argued on competing sides at an appeals court in a case over whether the Wake County district attorney can prosecute Attorney General Josh Stein or others for a 2020 campaign commercial. Private attorneys for Stein and Wake District Attorney Lorrin Freeman met Tuesday before a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. At issue is a state law that makes certain political speech a crime. Stein's campaign ad criticized his then-Republican challenger for AG over untested rape kits. Stein and his allies say the 1931 law is unconstitutional and want the judges to block its enforcement.

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A U.S. Supreme Court case involving North Carolina's congressional districts could have ramifications for the way voting districts are drawn in other states. At issue in Wednesday's arguments is whether state courts can strike down U.S. House maps passed by state lawmakers for violating state constitutions. North Carolina's Republican legislative leaders are asserting an “independent state legislature” theory — claiming the U.S. Constitution gives no role to state courts in federal election disputes. The outcome could affect similar lawsuits pending in state courts in Kentucky, New Mexico and Utah. It also could have implications in New York and Ohio, where state courts previously struck down U.S. House districts.

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A former Miami congressman who signed a $50 million consulting contract with Venezuela’s socialist government was arrested Monday on charges of money laundering and representing a foreign government without registering. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami says Republican David Rivera was arrested in Atlanta. The eight-count indictment alleges he was part of a conspiracy to lobby on behalf of Venezuela to improve U.S.-Venezuela relations, resolve an oil company legal dispute and end U.S. economic sanctions against the South American nation — without registering as a foreign agent. A lawyer for Rivera said he had not seen the indictment and Rivera did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

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Attorneys for the family of a Ugandan activist killed by a swinging metal gate at Arches National Park in Utah are seeking $140 million in damages in a wrongful death lawsuit against the U.S. government. A federal judge on Monday heard opening statements in the death of 25-year-old Esther Nakajjigo. Attorneys described the accident that led to her death in 2020. She and her husband Ludovic Michaud were driving out of Arches National Park when wind blew an unsecured metal-pipe gate into the couple's car, killing her instantly. Nakajjigo was a prominent activist for women's issues in Uganda known for hosting a television program about women's issues.

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The family of country singer Naomi Judd has filed a notice seeking to voluntarily dismiss a lawsuit to seal the police investigation into her death. The family previously said that release of the records would cause them trauma and irreparable harm. The notice filed Monday says the family is now willing to dismiss the lawsuit because the journalists who requested the police records are not seeking photographs of the deceased or body cam footage taken inside the home. The notice also says a state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would make death investigation records private where the death is not the result of a crime. The voluntary dismissal is subject to approval by a judge.

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The Minnesota Board of Pharmacy is suing a Moorhead-based manufacturer of THC-laced gummies, saying the company’s candies contain far stronger doses of the chemical that gives marijuana its high than state law allows. The lawsuit filed Monday alleges that Northland Vapor and its stores in Moorhead and Bemidji are violating Minnesota’s new law allowing low-potency edible and drinkable cannabinoids. It alleges investigators found candies with 20 times the legal dose and packages containing 50 times the limit. The board says it has embargoed the products, which it says have a retail value of over $7 million

The Mall of America in suburban Minneapolis says it will toughen its trespassing policies as part of a settlement with the family of a boy who was severely injured when a man with a history of causing disturbances at the mall threw him from a third-floor balcony. Additional details of the settlement announced Monday were not released. The boy, identified only as Landen, was 5 when Emmanuel Aranda threw him nearly 40 feet to the ground. Aranda had been banned from the mall twice in previous years. He pleaded guilty in the attack. The family had sued the mall saying it should have prevented Aranda from “prowling” there without being closely followed.

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The Mississippi Department of Human Services is changing its demands against retired NFL quarterback Brett Favre in a lawsuit that seeks repayment of misspent welfare money. The funds were intended to help some of the poorest people in the U.S. The department dropped its demand of $1.1 million against Favre, acknowledging he has already repaid that money for an unfulfilled pledge of public speeches. But it made a new demand of up to $5 million against Favre and a university sports foundation, saying money from an anti-poverty program was improperly used to pay for a volleyball arena at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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A Minnesota town has backed away from a proposal to let people sue abortion providers, including organizations that provide abortion drugs by mail, after the state attorney general warned that the plan was unconstitutional. But the legislator behind the proposal, which is based on a Texas law, said Monday he’s not giving up despite the unanimous vote by the Prinsburg City Council on Friday to drop the idea. Republican Tim Miller, of Prinsburg, says he still thinks it's constitutional despite what Democratic Attorney General Keith Ellison says. Miller said he'll continue trying to enact it in other rural Minnesota communities.

As a businessman and president, Donald Trump faced a litany of lawsuits and criminal investigations yet emerged from the legal scrutiny time and again with his public and political standing largely intact. But he’s perhaps never confronted a probe as perilous as the Mar-a-Lago investigation, an inquiry focused on the potential mishandling of top-secret documents. The sense of vulnerability has been heightened in recent weeks by the Justice Department’s appointment of an aggressive special counsel, the removal of a Trump-requested independent arbiter and the unequivocal rejection by judges of his lawyers’ arguments.

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Tensions over gender identity and sexual orientation pervade the campuses of hundreds of U.S. Catholic and Protestant universities. The Christian teachings they ascribe to hold that God created humans in unchangeable male and female identities, and sex should only happen within the marriage of a man and a woman. But today’s students are used to far different values. The majority of Christian colleges and universities list “sexual orientation” in their nondiscrimination statements, and half of them also list “gender identity” – a big increase from even a decade ago. But translating that into practice creates struggles affecting most campus life — curriculum, enrollment at single-gender institutions, housing, restroom design, and pronoun use.

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Tensions over gender identity and sexual orientation pervade the campuses of hundreds of U.S. Catholic and Protestant universities. The Christian teachings they ascribe to hold that God created humans in unchangeable male and female identities, and sex should only happen within the marriage of a man and a woman. But today's students are used to far different values. The majority of Christian colleges and universities list “sexual orientation” in their nondiscrimination statements, and half of them also list “gender identity” – a big increase from even a decade ago. But translating that into practice creates struggles affecting most campus life — curriculum, enrollment at single-gender institutions, housing, restroom design, and pronoun use.

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A jury in Maine has awarded a former state trooper $300,000 after determining the state police wrongly retaliated when he raised concerns about its intelligence gathering work. George Loder filed a whistleblower lawsuit claiming he was reassigned and then denied a transfer after he took his concerns about the Maine Intelligence Analysis Center to his superiors. Loder said the center had gathered intelligence on power line protesters, gun buyers and others who had committed no crime. The Bangor Daily News reported the jury deliberated for more than five hours Friday before finding in Loder's favor. State police had defended the intelligence work and denied that any retaliation occurred.

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Taylor Swift fans are suing Ticketmaster for "price fixing" and "fraud", following the recent 'Eras' tour ticket-buying debacle.

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Victims of a Texas elementary school shooting are seeking a $27 billion class action lawsuit against city and state police, the city of Uvalde and other school and law enforcement officials for failing to follow active shooter protocol, according to the lawsuit filed this week. The lawsuit filed this week seeks damages for survivors of the May 24 shooting who were present and have sustained “emotional or psychological damages as a result of the defendants’ conduct and omissions on that date.” Among those suing are school staff and representatives of minors who were present when a gunman stormed Robb Elementary, killing 19 children and two teachers.

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Lawyers for a man who was freed in 2015 after spending a quarter-century in prison for an infamous tourist killing says he will receive nearly $18 million in legal settlements from the city and state of New York. Lawyers for Johnny Hincapie’s said Friday it marks one of the largest settlements for a wrongful conviction in New York City history. The Colombian-born Hincapie was among a group of young men accused of fatally stabbing Utah tourist Brian Watkins on a subway station platform in 1990. Eighteen years old at the time, with no criminal history, Hincapie said he was coerced to falsely confess to the notorious Labor Day crime.

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