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Pediatrician

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Parents tired of worrying about classroom outbreaks and sick of telling their elementary school-age children no to sleepovers and family gatherings felt a wave of relief Thursday when Pfizer asked the U.S. government to authorize its COVID-19 vaccine for youngsters ages 5 to 11.

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If your child gets sick, notify their doctor and school immediately. Your pediatrician will help determine if your kid should get tested based on their symptoms, likelihood of exposure and the infection rates and availability of tests in your area. The CDC advises that school-age children be prioritized for testing if:

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If your child’s anxiety is not improving or your child seems to be struggling with learning overall, talk with your health care provider. Together you can determine if there is a larger issue that may need to be addressed or if your child can benefit from speaking to a psychologist or psychiatrist.

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Martina Velasquez of Weston was 13 when she first became aware of secret societies for depressed teens on Instagram and Tumblr. “When you are in a position of absolute depression and hopelessness, you think you are completely alone,” she said.

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— Share the facts. E-cigarettes and vapes reduce exposure to some of the harmful chemicals of tobacco cigarettes, but no one really knows the impact of these products on kids’ health. And studies show they contain formaldehyde.

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