Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Political Parties

  • Updated

Alabama's Republican Party has declared a tie in the primary race for a state Senate seat and says the winner will be chosen by lot. The party's Candidate Committee held a hearing Saturday and said the District 27 race between Auburn City Councilman Jay Hovey and incumbent Tom Whatley was officially a tie. It said the winner would be determined in accordance with the state election code. The code says the Secretary of State shall decide the winner by lot. The district covers Tallapoosa, Lee and Russell counties. The GOP news release did not provide details on when the winner would be selected or the method to be used.

  • Updated

Wisconsin Democrats looking to unseat Republican Sen. Ron Johnson are focusing their attacks on him, and not each other, as each of the eight candidates make their case to party activists at the state convention held six weeks before the primary. The Democratic Senate candidates on Sunday blasted Johnson for his attempt to deliver fake Republican Electoral College ballots, his skepticism over COVID-19 vaccines, his opposition to gun control measures and his support for overturning Roe v. Wade. Polls show a tight Democratic primary between Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes and Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry.

  • Updated

Congressional primary runoffs are rare in Mississippi. But this year, two of the state’s Republican incumbents are fighting to keep their jobs in runoffs against challengers from their own party. Two-term Rep. Michael Guest faces former Navy pilot Michael Cassidy in a runoff Tuesday in central Mississippi's 3rd District, while six-term Rep. Steven Palazzo faces sheriff Mike Ezell in the southern 4th District. Palazzo's runoff comes after he was accused in a congressional ethics report of abusing his office by misspending campaign funds. Guest was forced into a runoff amid criticism of his vote to create an independent commission to investigate the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

  • Updated

Official results of this month’s local elections in Cambodia confirm a landslide victory by Prime Minister Hun Sen’s ruling party. The National Election Committee says the results showed the Cambodian People's Party received 74.3% of the votes, and the opposition Candlelight Party about 22.3%. The CPP has held an iron grip on power for decades, and has the huge advantage of controlling almost every level of government. Its opponents are less organized, with fewer resources and fearful of intimidation. Hun Sen, an authoritarian ruler in a nominally democratic state, has held power for 37 years. He has said he intends to stay in office until 2028, and has endorsed one of his sons to succeed him.

  • Updated

The end of Roe v. Wade started in the Senate. The Senate Republican partnership with President Donald Trump to confirm conservative justices paved the way for the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling on abortion rights. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell set the strategy in motion years ago, changing the Senate’s rules to achieve its goal. Trump and McConnell also had the backing of almost all Republican senators. Lawmakers head into the midterm elections in November with control of Congress at stake and elections serving as a referendum on the future of abortion access. Democrats vow legislation to protect abortion access and Republicans want to impose further limits.

  • Updated

Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers hopes to translate anger over the U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade into votes this fall as he vows to fight a 173-year-old state abortion ban in any way he can. Evers won election in the battleground state four years ago by just over 1 percentage point. He told The Associated Press ahead of his appearance Saturday at the Wisconsin Democratic Party convention that abortion will energize key independent voters to support him and other Democrats. Wisconsin’s governor’s race is expected to be one of the hardest fought in the country this year.

  • Updated

South Dakota Republicans looking to regroup after the ouster of the GOP attorney general gave their support for the job to a man with extensive experience in leading state and federal law enforcement agencies. Delegates at the Republican convention also bounced an incumbent. The group kicked off selections for key state offices by choosing former attorney general and U.S. attorney Marty Jackley to run for AG over Division of Criminal Investigation Director David Natvig. Jackley was succeeded in his last stint as attorney general by Jason Ravnsborg, who was removed from office last week. Delegates denied Secretary of State Steve Barnett the opportunity for a second term. Monae Johnson won after opposing online voting, online voter registration and online registration updates.

  • Updated

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

  • Updated

Mitt Romney isn’t up for reelection this year, but his name is surfacing in Republican primaries throughout the nation. Candidates are using the label “Mitt Romney Republican” to frame opponents as insufficiently conservative and enemies of the Trump-era GOP. Candidates have employed the concept in attack ads and talking points in Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania. In Romney's home state Utah, Republican challengers taking on incumbent congressmen are using the attack, even though Romney won overwhelmingly only four years ago. The fact that Romney remains potent attack fodder reflects his singular position in politics and ongoing divisions within the Republican Party.

The nine justices of the Supreme Court made clear in their landmark ruling Friday whether they stand on abortion. The conservative majority overturned the Roe v. Wade decision from 1973 and stripped away women’s constitutional protections for abortion. Every high court nominee, in one form or another, was asked during Senate hearings about his or her views of Roe. It's informative to see how the Republican-nominated justices responded over the years when questioned by members of the Senate Judiciary Committee before joining the court.

  • Updated

South Carolina’s primaries end Tuesday with only two statewide runoffs, one for each party. Republicans will choose their candidate for the open Education Superintendent office, while Democrats choose their nominee for U.S. Senate to take on incumbent Tim Scott as he seeks a second full term. There also are six state House runoffs. Only one involves incumbents. Democratic Reps. Roger Kirby and Cezar McKnight were drawn through redistricting into the same district that stretches across three counties but is centered in Williamsburg County.

  • Updated

Democratic officials across the nation hope to harness their party's collective outrage and sadness to improve their political outlook this fall after the Supreme Court's stunning decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Abortion was an afterthought for much of the year for many voters. It was overshadowed by record gas prices, surging inflation and President Joe Biden’s low popularity. But on Friday, a Supreme Court majority of conservative justices ensured that abortion would be a central issue in U.S. politics for the foreseeable future. Polling shows that relatively few Americans wanted to see Roe overturned.

Rep. David Valadao has advanced to a November runoff in a Democratic-tilting district in California’s Central Valley. He survived a challenge from a fellow Republican who faulted the congressman for his vote to impeach then-President Donald Trump. With most of the votes tallied in the 22nd District, Valadao had about 26% of the vote, several points ahead of rival Republican Chris Mathys. Valadao’s advance to the November runoff against Democrat Rudy Salas, a state legislator, caps a list of competitive races in California districts that will play into the fight for control of Congress. Democrats are protecting a fragile House majority.

Rep. David Valadao has advanced to a November runoff in a Democratic-tilting district in California’s Central Valley. He survived a challenge from a fellow Republican who faulted the congressman for his vote to impeach then-President Donald Trump. With most of the votes tallied in the 22nd District, Valadao had about 26% of the vote, several points ahead of rival Republican Chris Mathys. Valadao’s advance to the November runoff against Democrat Rudy Salas, a state legislator, caps a list of competitive races in California districts that will play into the fight for control of Congress. Democrats are protecting a fragile House majority.

  • Updated

The House has sent President Joe Biden the most wide-ranging gun violence bill Congress has passed in decades. The bill that passed the House on Friday is a measured compromise that at once illustrates progress on the long-intractable issue and the deep-seated partisan divide that persists. The Democratic-led chamber approved the election-year legislation with every Democrat and 14 Republicans voting yes. That caps a spurt of action prompted by voters’ revulsion over last month’s mass shootings in New York and Texas. The Senate approved it earlier by a bipartisan 65-33 margin, with 15 Republicans joining all Democrats. The White House says Biden will sign the bill Saturday morning.

  • Updated

While South Carolina is not one of the 13 states with “trigger laws” banning abortion after the Supreme Court's decision to overturn federal protections, lawmakers in the Republican-controlled state are ready to further restrict the procedure. Shortly after the high court's ruling came down Friday, Gov. Henry McMaster said he would immediately work with the state legislature to find "the best solution for protecting the lives of unborn South Carolinians.” A federal appeals court in February blocked the law signed by McMaster last year that banned most abortions after six weeks. The state attorney general's office asked the appeals court to lift its injunction Friday.

  • Updated

Democratic leaders across the nation are vowing to help women who travel to seek abortions. They also pledged Friday to shield patients and medical professionals from being pursued by authorities in states where the procedure becomes outlawed after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade. On the West Coast, the Democratic governors of California, Washington and Oregon issued a joint “multi-state commitment,” saying they will work together to defend patients and care providers. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, also a Democrat, emphasized the importance of the November election. In that state, the GOP controls the Legislature but lacks veto-proof majorities to outlaw abortion.

  • Updated

Democratic leaders across the nation are vowing to help women who travel to seek abortions. They also pledged Friday to shield patients and medical professionals from being pursued by authorities in states where the procedure becomes outlawed after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade. On the West Coast, the Democratic governors of California, Washington and Oregon issued a joint “multi-state commitment,” saying they will work together to defend patients and care providers. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, also a Democrat, emphasized the importance of the November election. In that state, the GOP controls the Legislature but lacks veto-proof majorities to outlaw abortion.

  • Updated

South Dakota Republicans are meeting to choose candidates for attorney general, lieutenant governor and other offices with the impeachment conviction and removal of Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg hanging over the convention in Watertown. Former Attorney General Marty Jackley and Division of Criminal Investigation Director David Natvig both want to be considered for the role. Lt. Gov. Larry Rhoden, who is closely allied with Gov. Kristi Noem, faces a challenger from former House Speaker Steve Haugaard, who lost a primary campaign to Noem earlier this month. Delegates also will choose their nominee for secretary of state and will try to forge a united platform after months of Capitol infighting.

  • Updated

Four Democratic lawmakers are asking federal regulators to investigate Apple and Google for allegedly deceiving mobile phone users by enabling the collection and sale of their personal data. Their call comes as the Supreme Court ended the constitutional protections for abortion Friday. The court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade is expected to lead to abortion bans in about half the states. And privacy experts say that could make women vulnerable as their personal data could be used to surveil pregnancies and shared with police or sold to vigilantes. The request for an investigation of the two California-based tech giants came in a letter to Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan.

Top Indiana Republicans expect to see action toward tightening the state’s abortion law during the Legislature’s special session that is set to start next month. Leaders of the Republican-dominated Legislature said Friday they were glad the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling returned decisions on regulation abortion to the states. Republican House Speaker Todd Huston said he expected lawmakers would “take action to further protect life when we return to the Statehouse.” GOP Gov. Eric Holcomb earlier this week called the Legislature into a special session starting July 6 to take up a tax refund proposal, but state law allows legislators to take up any subject.

  • Updated

Two days after losing a bitter primary to a rival she once deemed a “sellout” for occasionally working with Democrats, Katie Arrington appeared at a “unity rally” to urge South Carolina Republicans to come together and back Rep. Nancy Mace in the fall general election. Republicans, Arrington said, “may fight like banshees inside the house, but once we walk out that door, it’s one team, one fight.” The cordial tone is striking in a Republican Party increasingly defined by an absolutist approach to politics. Aware that the coastal congressional district is one of the few places in the state where Democrats have been competitive, Republicans say it is important to move past the party’s internal divisions.

  • Updated

The Senate has approved a bipartisan gun violence bill. The vote late Thursday clears the way for expected House passage Friday of what will be Congress’ most far-reaching response in decades to the nation’s run of brutal mass shootings. Republicans have long derailed Democratic efforts to curb firearms. But after last month's mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, Democrats and some Republicans decided that congressional inaction was untenable. It took nearly a month of closed-door talks but a group of senators from both parties emerged with a compromise embodying incremental but impactful movement.

  • Updated

A U.S. Senate candidate in Colorado, Joe O'Dea, is a rarity in the Republican Party as a supporter of abortion rights. O'Dea is running for his party's nomination to challenge Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet in a state that's grown increasingly liberal. On other issues, O’Dea sounds like a typical conservative. He wants to cut back government regulation and expand oil and gas production. But his support for abortion rights in most cases stands out in a party for which opposition to abortion has become a bedrock principle. O'Dea's chief rival in Tuesday's primary is state Rep. Ron Hanks, who opposes abortion in all circumstances.

Sixteen states and Puerto Rico are jockeying for early slots on a new Democratic presidential primary calendar, offering presentations for party bosses on why they deserve to go first — or at least close to it. Iowa has held the leadoff position since 1972, but technical glitches undermined its Democratic caucus two years ago. That sparked clamor for change. States are pressing their case over three days of Democrats’ Rules and Bylaws Committee meetings. The full Democratic National Committee plans to vote in August. It could opt to alter the current order of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina — or keep it the same.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News