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Giants McCovey Baseball

Hall of Famer Willie McCovey's No. 44 is displayed Nov. 7, the day before his public celebration of life was held, at what is now the San Francisco Giants' Oracle Park.

SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco Giants have changed the name of their ballpark again, from AT&T Park to Oracle Park.

The Giants scheduled a news conference Thursday to announce the 20-year deal with Oracle. New signage was expected immediately.

San Francisco opened the waterfront ballpark in 2000 and it has been known as Pac Bell Park, SBC Park and AT&T Park since 2006. The Giants won the World Series in 2010, ‘12 and ‘14.

Oracle Arena in Oakland is where the two-time defending NBA champion Golden State Warriors are playing their final season before a move to San Francisco — near the Giants’ venue — and the new Chase Center. The San Francisco Chronicle first reported the ballpark’s name change on Wednesday.

Buchter, A’s agree to 1-year deal

OAKLAND — Left-handed reliever Ryan Buchter and the Oakland Athletics have agreed to a $1.4 million, one-year contract to avoid salary arbitration.

Buchter more than doubled his 2018 salary of $555,000.

The team announced the deal Thursday, one day before salary figures are exchanged between arbitration-eligible players and their clubs.

Buchter, a key bullpen piece for AL Manager of the Year Bob Melvin, went 6-0 with a 2.75 ERA in 54 games and 39 1/3 innings. He allowed only 2 of 30 inherited runners to score, the lowest percentage in the majors.

The A’s have five other players eligible for arbitration, including big league home run champion Khris Davis.

Mets sign Lowrie for 2 years, $20M

NEW YORK — Free agent infielder Jed Lowie and the New York Mets have agreed to a $20 million, two-year contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity Thursday because the agreement is subject to a successful physical.

Lowrie is a switch-hitter who turns 35 in April and is coming off his first All-Star season. Like new Mets second baseman Robinson Cano, he used to be represented by Brodie Van Wagenen, co-head of CAA Baseball before he became New York’s general manager in October. Like Van Wagenen, Lowrie played baseball at Stanford.

While Lowrie played mostly second base for the Oakland Athletics the past three seasons, he figures to see time at third and first with the Mets, who acquired Cano from Seattle last month.

Lowrie is the fifth All-Star added by the Mets this offseason, following Cano, closer Edwin Diaz, catcher Wilson Ramos and reliever Jeurys Familia, traded to Oakland last summer and then re-signed by New York as a free agent.

A veteran of 11 major league seasons, Lowrie set career highs with 23 homers and 99 RBIs last year and hit .267. He also has played for Boston and Houston, and he has a .262 career big league average with 104 homers and 509 RBIs.

He struck out a career-worst 128 times last year, up from 100 in 2017 and 65 in 2016, when he was limited to 87 games because of a bruised right shin and a bunion on his left foot that needed surgery.

Lowrie completed a contract that paid $28 million over four seasons.

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