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UpValley Family Centers

There has been a lot of confusion about marijuana decriminalization and legalization over the last few years, particularly since the passage of Prop. 64 in November. One thing that remains clear and constant is that marijuana is not legal or healthy for teenagers.*

Research in adolescent brain development and addiction science shows that pre-adult marijuana use can negatively affect teenagers’ brain development and significantly increase their risks of developing addiction, substance abuse disorders, and mental health concerns.

Under Prop. 64, also known as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, persons younger than 21 are to be cited for all marijuana offenses, including use and possession. We are providing this public service announcement to advise that our community, including law enforcement, schools and the court, intends to uphold the law as voted for by the People of the State of California. Thus, marijuana offenses by minors in Calistoga will be cited and prosecuted appropriately. Our goal in all cases will be prevention, health, and safety for our youth.

For additional information regarding teen marijuana use, please refer to:

This is message is part of ongoing community substance use education presented by The UpValley Partnership for Youth (UVPY). UVPY works to address the problem of underage drinking and substance use in our community. It is a federally-funded, broad-based coalition made up of youth, parents, nonprofits, law enforcement, schools, faith-based groups and fraternal organizations in northern Napa County, and is led by the UpValley Family Centers and the Napa County Office of Education.

UVPY meets the fourth Monday of the month and meetings are open to the public. For more information about meetings or the work of UVPY, contact Loralyn Taylor, 965-5010.

*Prop. 64 does not detract from the Compassionate Use Act, which allows use after doctor recommendation even by minors. It’s important to note, however, that such use remains illegal under federal law and that, because of the health risks unique to minors, the California Medical Association recommends it be considered only for serious medical conditions for which there are no viable conventional alternatives.

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The Weekly Calistogan Editor